Slang meaning of Chop

Chop means: A Chinese word signifying quality, first introduced to mariners in the China trade. Soon became a common word of seamen applied to fine silks, teas, tobacco, etc.

What is the slang meaning/definition of Chop ?

Chop means: A Chinese word signifying quality, first introduced to mariners in the China trade. Soon became a common word of seamen applied to fine silks, teas, tobacco, etc.

Slang definition of Chop

Chop means: A Chinese word signifying quality, first introduced to mariners in the China trade. Soon became a common word of seamen applied to fine silks, teas, tobacco, etc.

More meanings / definitions of A Chinese word signifying quality, first introduced to mariners in the China trade. Soon became a common word of seamen applied to fine silks, teas, tobacco, etc. or words, sentences containing A Chinese word signifying quality, first introduced to mariners in the China trade. Soon became a common word of seamen applied to fine silks, teas, tobacco, etc.?

Solid (a.): Applied to a compound word whose parts are closely united and form an unbroken word; -- opposed to hyphened.

Archaism (a.): An ancient, antiquated, or old-fashioned, word, expression, or idiom; a word or form of speech no longer in common use.

Hyphen (n.): A mark or short dash, thus [-], placed at the end of a line which terminates with a syllable of a word, the remainder of which is carried to the next line; or between the parts of many a compound word; as in fine-leaved, clear-headed. It is also sometimes used to separate the syllables of words.

Derivative (n.): A word formed from another word, by a prefix or suffix, an internal modification, or some other change; a word which takes its origin from a root.

Preposition (n.): A word employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival or adverbial sense, with some other word; a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word; -- so called because usually placed before the word with which it is phrased; as, a bridge of iron; he comes from town; it is good for food; he escaped by running.

Closure (v. t.): A method of putting an end to debate and securing an immediate vote upon a measure before a legislative body. It is similar in effect to the previous question. It was first introduced into the British House of Commons in 1882. The French word cloture was originally applied to this proceeding.

Verbal (a.): Having word answering to word; word for word; literal; as, a verbal translation.

Porcelain (n.): A fine translucent or semitransculent kind of earthenware, made first in China and Japan, but now also in Europe and America; -- called also China, or China ware.

East (n.): The eastern parts of the earth; the regions or countries which lie east of Europe; the orient. In this indefinite sense, the word is applied to Asia Minor, Syria, Chaldea, Persia, India, China, etc.; as, the riches of the East; the diamonds and pearls of the East; the kings of the East.

Chinese (n. sing. & pl.): A native or natives of China, or one of that yellow race with oblique eyelids who live principally in China.

Enclitical (v. i.): Affixed; subjoined; -- said of a word or particle which leans back upon the preceding word so as to become a part of it, and to lose its own independent accent, generally varying also the accent of the preceding word.

Seaman (n.): One whose occupation is to assist in the management of ships at sea; a mariner; a sailor; -- applied both to officers and common mariners, but especially to the latter. Opposed to landman, or landsman.

Chinese (a.): Of or pertaining to China; peculiar to China.

Cathay (n.): China; -- an old name for the Celestial Empire, said have been introduced by Marco Polo and to be a corruption of the Tartar name for North China (Khitai, the country of the Khitans.)

Sea term (): A term used specifically by seamen; a nautical word or phrase.

Number (n.): The distinction of objects, as one, or more than one (in some languages, as one, or two, or more than two), expressed (usually) by a difference in the form of a word; thus, the singular number and the plural number are the names of the forms of a word indicating the objects denoted or referred to by the word as one, or as more than one.

Hong (n.): A mercantile establishment or factory for foreign trade in China, as formerly at Canton; a succession of offices connected by a common passage and used for business or storage.

Extra- (): A Latin preposition, denoting beyond, outside of; -- often used in composition as a prefix signifying outside of, beyond, besides, or in addition to what is denoted by the word to which it is prefixed.

Hypo- (): A prefix signifying a less quantity, or a low state or degree, of that denoted by the word with which it is joined, or position under or beneath.

Eclogue (n.): A pastoral poem, in which shepherds are introduced conversing with each other; a bucolic; an idyl; as, the Ecloques of Virgil, from which the modern usage of the word has been established.

Auxesis (n.): A figure by which a grave and magnificent word is put for the proper word; amplification; hyperbole.

Logogram (n.): A word letter; a phonogram, that, for the sake of brevity, represents a word; as, |, i. e., t, for it. Cf. Grammalogue.

Government (n.): The influence of a word in regard to construction, requiring that another word should be in a particular case.

Primitive (n.): An original or primary word; a word not derived from another; -- opposed to derivative.

Conjugate (n.): A word agreeing in derivation with another word, and therefore generally resembling it in signification.

Import (n.): That which a word, phrase, or document contains as its signification or intention or interpretation of a word, action, event, and the like.

Metalepsis (n.): The continuation of a trope in one word through a succession of significations, or the union of two or more tropes of a different kind in one word.

Aqua (n.): Water; -- a word much used in pharmacy and the old chemistry, in various signification, determined by the word or words annexed.

Radical (n.): A primitive word; a radix, root, or simple, underived, uncompounded word; an etymon.

Vocable (n.): A word; a term; a name; specifically, a word considered as composed of certain sounds or letters, without regard to its meaning.

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Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to A Chinese word signifying quality, first introduced to mariners in the China trade. Soon became a common word of seamen applied to fine silks, teas, tobacco, etc.

Meaning of Chop

Chop means: A Chinese word signifying quality, first introduced to mariners in the China trade. Soon became a common word of seamen applied to fine silks, teas, tobacco, etc.

Meaning of sod

sod means: 1 n, v, adj generic word signifying displeasure. Attached to any word or phrase it has the immediate effect of making it derogatory. Sod off get lost. sod you bite me. sod it damn it; forget it. old sod old git, etc, etc. Use at will - it has a friendly tone to it and is unlikely to get you into trouble. 2 n a lump of turf (universal).

Meaning of Celestial

Celestial means: A term used in the West to refer to people of Chinese descent; the word derives from an old name for China, the "Celestial Empire."

Meaning of Grommet

Grommet means: A name British seamen gave to an apprentice sailor, or ship's boy. The word comes from the Spanish word grumete, which has the same meaning.

Meaning of Vamos

Vamos means: A Spanish word signifying let us go.

Meaning of jib (2)

jib (2) means: (1) Describe something that someone does not want to say e.g. a coarse word such as sex or fingering someone. (2) As a word to replace any other word really. An example sentence: did you see that man jibbing along., There are many different forms of the word jibs, including, jibbed, jibbing, jib and jibbified and all of these words are in extensive use in many secondary schools in SE England. Jamie and Adam thought of this word and are proud of how it has been used.

Meaning of chuff

chuff means: 1 v fart. 2 n one’s posterior. 3 n Northern England vagina. 4 interj general swear word usable much the same as “fuck”: It was all going fine until the chuffing pigs turned up. Entirely separate from the word “chuffed,” so use with care.

Meaning of catin

catin means: prostitute; slut; bitch (a common word used to refer to a prostitute, slut, or bitch. The word was more common in the 1980s, apparently in rap music, than it is nowadays) (ex.: Il était mordu de cette catin.)

Meaning of WORD/ WORD UP/ WORD IS BOND

WORD/ WORD UP/ WORD IS BOND means: To get wild in any situation. To act violent at any given moment. To whyle out on someone for no reason. To act wild in fun without violence. This word was new and still underground until a rape in central park where young black and Hispanic teens were found guilty for brutally beating and raping a white woman. And the press got a hold of the word and used it as the catch phrase for the criminal act.

Meaning of WORD/ WORD UP/ WORD IS BOND

WORD/ WORD UP/ WORD IS BOND means: To get wild in any situation. To act violent at any given moment. To whyle out on someone for no reason. To act wild in fun without violence. This word was new and still underground until a rape in central park where young black and Hispanic teens were found guilty for brutally beating and raping a white woman. And the press got a hold of the word and used it as the catch phrase for the criminal act.

Meaning of chach

chach means: (ed: have added this verbatim - I have no idea if it's serious or not, but since it's Californian - and weird - it could well be true! Personally I'm quite happy with saying 'orange orange'.) Chach describes the color of something that is orange. It's very confusing to have the color and fruit both have the same name, and sounds stupid to say, "Hey, look at that orange orange!" Also, a foreigner might get confused when they hear "Look at that orange book," and not see any fruit on the cover. In order to clear up the whole mess, this new word describing the color previously known as orange has been invented and spread about Northern California, and now everybody knows what it means and is grateful for the substitute word. It needs to be spread to the rest of the world, appeasing the minds of all others who speak the English language, and the word 'orange' no longer has any meaning when dealing with color. "Hey, look at that chach orange!" Doesn't that sound much better? something to be 'chach', We are grateful for the word 'chach', and this should be a big step in informing others and should soon become a common word everywhere, and the word currently used for the color, 'orange', will be erased from the world of adjectives forever!

Meaning of aiya

aiya means: Apparently a Chinese slang word for "crap" or "Oh no!" (ed: as usual we added it all in - but said we'd appreciate feedback on this one... like *is* it 'slang?) Ray says his Chinese(Taiwanese) friend tells him this is a slang expression of shock or surprise, whem something is unexpected. Any advance on that?

Meaning of scoper, scopey

scoper, scopey means: A euphemism for a person with cerebral palsy, motor disablement, or spasticity.; i,e a 'spastic', This word was coined as a result of the charity 'The Spastics Society" changing their name to Scope in 1994, to avoid continued association with the common usage of the word 'spastic' as a general term of abuse. However it didn't take long for 'scoper' or 'scopey' to become a common euphemism in place of 'spastic'

Meaning of Weed, the (The Weed, The Indian Weed)

Weed, the (The Weed, The Indian Weed) means: Tobacco, typically when referring to smoking tobacco, often used derisively. Smoking was common in the 17th and 18th century will all social classes partaking in the habit. Almost all tobacco was smoked in pipes, typically made of clay. Originally the pipes had small bowls and shirt stem but the Dutch enlarged the bowl and lengthened the stem.This new style clay pipe was quickly adopted by all European countries and became the most common pipe used during the Golden Age. This allowed for a large quantity of tobacco to smoked while at the same time cooling the smoke through the longer stem. The clay pipes were fragile and broke often. Most lower class smokers used a shorter stem pipe. Cigars were a late bloomer, being introduced first by Spain to other Europeans. Spain seems to have started making cigars as early as 1717 but the habit was not readily adopted in the American Colonies until as late as 1762. Widespread cigar smoking would not be common until the American civil war. Cigarettes would not reach Europe and the North America until 1855. Cigarettes reached Europe first via Turkey and then eventually made it to America.

Meaning of Damn

Damn means: Stupid, ludicrous or a (popular) word to express mild aggression. However, that the word Damn can be used or spoken in a way that denotes it as a curse or swear word, as generally looked upon in the United States of America. But speaking the word Damn is not considered to be in this category"

Meaning of sarth effrikan

sarth effrikan means: A list of words supposedly an 'introduction' to the language dialect used in South Africa: (ed: in no particular order!): Braai A braai is the first thing you will be invited to when you visit South Africa. It is a backyard all-weather barbecue. So you will have to go even if it's raining like mad and you have a hang of a cold. At a braai you will be introduced to a substance known as "mieliepap". Ag This one of the most useful South African words. Pronounced like the "ach" in "achtung", it can be used to start a reply when you are asked a tricky question, as in: "Ag, I don't know." Or a sense of resignation: "Ag, I'll have some more mieliepap then." It can stand alone too as a signal of irritation or of pleasure. Donner A rude word, from the Afrikaans "donder" (thunder). Pronounced "dorner", it means "beat up." Your rugby team can get donnered in a game, or your boss can donner you if you do a lousy job. Eina It means "ouch". Pronounced "aynah", you can shout it out in sympathy when someone burns his finger on a hot mielie at a braai. Hey Often used at the end of a sentence to emphasise the importance of what has just been said, as in "Jislaaik boet, you're only going to stop a lekker klap if you can't find your takkies now, hey?" It can also stand alone as a question. Instead of saying "excuse me?" or "pardon?" when you have not heard something directed at you, you can say: "Hey?" Isit? This is a great word in conversations. Afrikaner etymologists labored for several years in sterile conditions to devise a way of attaching the word 'is' to the word 'it' and enable South Africans to make intelligent conversation around the braai. Example: "The Russians will succeed in developing capitalism once they adopt a work ethic and respect for private ownership." "Isit?" Jawelnofine This is another conversation fallback word. Derived from the four words: "yes", "well", "no" and "fine", it means roughly "how about that." If your bank manager tells you your account is overdrawn, you can say with confidence: "Jawelnofine." Jislaaik Pronounced" Yis-like", it is an expression of astonishment. For instance,if someone tells you there are a billion people in China, a suitable comment is: "Jislaaik, that's a hang of a lot of people, hey?" Klap Pronounced "klup" - an Afrikaans word meaning smack, whack or spank. If you spend too much time at the bioscope at exam time, you could end up catching a sharp klap from your pa. In America, that is called child abuse. In South Africa, it is called promoting education. Lekker An Afrikaans word meaning nice, this word is used by all language groups to express approval. Gentlemen who spy someone of the opposite sex who is good-looking, may remark: "Lekk-errrrrrr!" Tackies These are sneakers or running shoes. Also used to describe automobile or truck tires. "Fat tackies" are big tires, as in: "Where did you get those lekker fat tackies on your Volksie, hey?" Dop This word has two basic meanings, one good and one bad. First the good. A dop is a drink, a cocktail, a sundowner, a noggin. If you are invited over for a dop, be careful. It could be one or two sedate drinks or a blast, depending on the company you have fallen in with. Now the bad: To dop is to fail. If you dopped Standard Two (Grade 4) more than once, you probably won't be reading this. Sarmie A sandwich. For generations, schoolchildren have traded sarmies during lunch breaks. If you are sending kids off to school in the morning, don't give them liver-polony sarmies. They are the toughest to trade. Bakkie This word is pronounced "bucky" and it is a small truck or pick-up. Young men can take their "cherrie" (girlfriend) to the drive-in bioscope in a bakkie but it is not always an appropriate form of transport because the seats don't recline and you may be forced to watch the film. Howzit A universal South African greeting, often used with the word "No" as in this exchange: "No, howzit?" "No, fine." "Isit?" Mrs Balls'. Chutney We don't know if the lady ever existed, but if she did she has earned a place of honour in South African kitchen history. South Africans eat it with everything, including fried egg.

Meaning of Willy

Willy means: Another word for penis. It is the word many young boys are taught as it is a nicer word than most of the alternatives. Some people also use it for girls as there are no nice alternatives. Hence "woman's willy". Also used by grown ups who don't wish to offend (this word is safe to use with elderly Grandparents).

Meaning of Willy

Willy means: - Another word for penis. It is the word many young boys are taught as it is a nicer word than most of the alternatives. Some people also use it for girls as there are no nice alternatives. Hence "woman's willy". Also used by grown ups who don't wish to offend (this word is safe to use with elderly Grandparents).

Meaning of Hakui

Hakui means: Word means 'burnt' in Chinese

Meaning of Clutch

Clutch means: Another knock off of the word "Cool" It can be used as a single word expression, or in conjunction. This word is especially usful when said slowly. "Cluuuuuutch!"

Meaning of Solid

Solid means: Applied to a compound word whose parts are closely united and form an unbroken word; -- opposed to hyphened.

Meaning of Archaism

Archaism means: An ancient, antiquated, or old-fashioned, word, expression, or idiom; a word or form of speech no longer in common use.

Meaning of Hyphen

Hyphen means: A mark or short dash, thus [-], placed at the end of a line which terminates with a syllable of a word, the remainder of which is carried to the next line; or between the parts of many a compound word; as in fine-leaved, clear-headed. It is also sometimes used to separate the syllables of words.

Meaning of Derivative

Derivative means: A word formed from another word, by a prefix or suffix, an internal modification, or some other change; a word which takes its origin from a root.

Meaning of Preposition

Preposition means: A word employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival or adverbial sense, with some other word; a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word; -- so called because usually placed before the word with which it is phrased; as, a bridge of iron; he comes from town; it is good for food; he escaped by running.

Meaning of Closure

Closure means: A method of putting an end to debate and securing an immediate vote upon a measure before a legislative body. It is similar in effect to the previous question. It was first introduced into the British House of Commons in 1882. The French word cloture was originally applied to this proceeding.

Meaning of Verbal

Verbal means: Having word answering to word; word for word; literal; as, a verbal translation.

Meaning of Porcelain

Porcelain means: A fine translucent or semitransculent kind of earthenware, made first in China and Japan, but now also in Europe and America; -- called also China, or China ware.

Meaning of East

East means: The eastern parts of the earth; the regions or countries which lie east of Europe; the orient. In this indefinite sense, the word is applied to Asia Minor, Syria, Chaldea, Persia, India, China, etc.; as, the riches of the East; the diamonds and pearls of the East; the kings of the East.

Meaning of Chinese

Chinese means: A native or natives of China, or one of that yellow race with oblique eyelids who live principally in China.

Meaning of Enclitical

Enclitical means: Affixed; subjoined; -- said of a word or particle which leans back upon the preceding word so as to become a part of it, and to lose its own independent accent, generally varying also the accent of the preceding word.

Meaning of Seaman

Seaman means: One whose occupation is to assist in the management of ships at sea; a mariner; a sailor; -- applied both to officers and common mariners, but especially to the latter. Opposed to landman, or landsman.

Meaning of Chinese

Chinese means: Of or pertaining to China; peculiar to China.

Meaning of Cathay

Cathay means: China; -- an old name for the Celestial Empire, said have been introduced by Marco Polo and to be a corruption of the Tartar name for North China (Khitai, the country of the Khitans.)

Meaning of Sea term

Sea term means: A term used specifically by seamen; a nautical word or phrase.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Accompletive

Accompletive means: Tending to accomplish.

Meaning of Bind

Bind means: To bring (any one) under definite legal obligations; esp. under the obligation of a bond or covenant.

Meaning of Castalian

Castalian means: Of or pertaining to Castalia, a mythical fountain of inspiration on Mt. Parnassus sacred to the Muses.

Meaning of Divination

Divination means: The act of divining; a foreseeing or foretelling of future events; the pretended art discovering secret or future by preternatural means.

Meaning of Thessalian

Thessalian means: A native or inhabitant of Thessaly.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of RACKED−UP

RACKED−UP means: Racked−up is American slang for tense, nervous, worried.

Meaning of dela

dela means: Person displaying tendency towards insanity, crazy or uncoordinated behaviours. (Pronounced 'della') Came from the name of local psychiatric hospital, De La Pole Hospital.

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