Slang meaning of Linsey Woolsey

Linsey Woolsey means: A corruption of linen and wool. Material made of linen and wool mixed, light or coarse stuff. "He gave them coats of linsey woolsey, which were good and warm for winter, and good and light for summer.

What is the slang meaning/definition of Linsey Woolsey ?

Linsey Woolsey means: A corruption of linen and wool. Material made of linen and wool mixed, light or coarse stuff. "He gave them coats of linsey woolsey, which were good and warm for winter, and good and light for summer.

Slang definition of Linsey Woolsey

Linsey Woolsey means: A corruption of linen and wool. Material made of linen and wool mixed, light or coarse stuff. "He gave them coats of linsey woolsey, which were good and warm for winter, and good and light for summer.

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More meanings / definitions of A corruption of linen and wool. Material made of linen and wool mixed, light or coarse stuff. "He gave them coats of linsey woolsey, which were good and warm for winter, and good and light for summer. or words, sentences containing A corruption of linen and wool. Material made of linen and wool mixed, light or coarse stuff. "He gave them coats of linsey woolsey, which were good and warm for winter, and good and light for summer.?

Linsey-woolsey (n.): Cloth made of linen and wool, mixed.

Linsey-woolsey (a.): Made of linen and wool; hence, of different and unsuitable parts; mean.

Ticklenburg (n.): A coarse, mixed linen fabric made to be sold in the West Indies.

Borrel (n.): A kind of light stuff, of silk and wool.

Make (v. t.): To become; to be, or to be capable of being, changed or fashioned into; to do the part or office of; to furnish the material for; as, he will make a good musician; sweet cider makes sour vinegar; wool makes warm clothing.

Fringe (n.): An ornamental appendage to the border of a piece of stuff, originally consisting of the ends of the warp, projecting beyond the woven fabric; but more commonly made separate and sewed on, consisting sometimes of projecting ends, twisted or plaited together, and sometimes of loose threads of wool, silk, or linen, or narrow strips of leather, or the like.

Felt (n.): A cloth or stuff made of matted fibers of wool, or wool and fur, fulled or wrought into a compact substance by rolling and pressure, with lees or size, without spinning or weaving.

Linen (n.): Made of linen; as, linen cloth; a linen stocking.

Crepon (n.): A thin stuff made of the finest wool or silk, or of wool and silk.

Stuff (v. t.): Woven material not made into garments; fabric of any kind; specifically, any one of various fabrics of wool or worsted; sometimes, worsted fiber.

Braid (n.): A narrow fabric, as of wool, silk, or linen, used for binding, trimming, or ornamenting dresses, etc.

Linen (n.): Underclothing, esp. the shirt, as being, in former times, chiefly made of linen.

Sagathy (n.): A mixed woven fabric of silk and cotton, or silk and wool; sayette; also, a light woolen fabric.

From (prep.): Out of the neighborhood of; lessening or losing proximity to; leaving behind; by reason of; out of; by aid of; -- used whenever departure, setting out, commencement of action, being, state, occurrence, etc., or procedure, emanation, absence, separation, etc., are to be expressed. It is construed with, and indicates, the point of space or time at which the action, state, etc., are regarded as setting out or beginning; also, less frequently, the source, the cause, the occasion, out of which anything proceeds; -- the aritithesis and correlative of to; as, it, is one hundred miles from Boston to Springfield; he took his sword from his side; light proceeds from the sun; separate the coarse wool from the fine; men have all sprung from Adam, and often go from good to bad, and from bad to worse; the merit of an action depends on the principle from which it proceeds; men judge of facts from personal knowledge, or from testimony.

Metonymy (n.): A trope in which one word is put for another that suggests it; as, we say, a man keeps a good table instead of good provisions; we read Virgil, that is, his poems; a man has a warm heart, that is, warm affections.

Ferrandine (n.): A stuff made of silk and wool.

Fustian (n.): A kind of coarse twilled cotton or cotton and linen stuff, including corduroy, velveteen, etc.

Napery (n.): Table linen; also, linen clothing, or linen in general.

Fine (superl.): Made of fine materials; light; delicate; as, fine linen or silk.

Seersucker (n.): A light fabric, originally made in the East Indies, of silk and linen, usually having alternating stripes, and a slightly craped or puckered surface; also, a cotton fabric of similar appearance.

Jersey (n.): The finest of wool separated from the rest; combed wool; also, fine yarn of wool.

Dowlas (n.): A coarse linen cloth made in the north of England and in Scotland, now nearly replaced by calico.

Tweed (n.): A soft and flexible fabric for men's wear, made wholly of wool except in some inferior kinds, the wool being dyed, usually in two colors, before weaving.

Woolenet (n.): A thin, light fabric of wool.

Dagswain (n.): A coarse woolen fabric made of daglocks, or the refuse of wool.

Good (superl.): Not small, insignificant, or of no account; considerable; esp., in the phrases a good deal, a good way, a good degree, a good share or part, etc.

Hoddengray (a.): Applied to coarse cloth made of undyed wool, formerly worn by Scotch peasants.

Nubia (n.): A light fabric of wool, worn on the head by women; a cloud.

Damask (n.): A heavy woolen or worsted stuff with a pattern woven in the same way as the linen damask; -- made for furniture covering and hangings.

Osnaburg (n.): A species of coarse linen, originally made in Osnaburg, Germany.

Like to add another meaning or definition of A corruption of linen and wool. Material made of linen and wool mixed, light or coarse stuff. "He gave them coats of linsey woolsey, which were good and warm for winter, and good and light for summer.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to A corruption of linen and wool. Material made of linen and wool mixed, light or coarse stuff. "He gave them coats of linsey woolsey, which were good and warm for winter, and good and light for summer.

Meaning of Linsey Woolsey

Linsey Woolsey means: A corruption of linen and wool. Material made of linen and wool mixed, light or coarse stuff. "He gave them coats of linsey woolsey, which were good and warm for winter, and good and light for summer.

Meaning of Woolsey

Woolsey means: A cheap hat, usually made of wool.

Meaning of Linen Draper

Linen Draper means: Paper (newspaper). Has the morning linen come yet?

Meaning of LINEN DRAPER

LINEN DRAPER means: Linen draper is London Cockney rhyming slang for paper (newspaper).

Meaning of Crash

Crash means: A coarse kind of linen cloth used for towels.

Meaning of woolyback, wooly or wool

woolyback, wooly or wool means: Liverpudlian insult directed at anyone from 'out of town' but especially from South Lancashire or North Cheshire. It is often abbreviated simply to 'wool' or 'wooly'. The term possibly dates back to a time when the Lancashire miners wore pads of sheepskin over their shoulders to protect themselves when carrying coal. They were easily identifiable on the city streets because of the white fibres of wool still clinging to their clothing.

Meaning of AllAround Light:

AllAround Light: means: A light showing an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of 360 degrees. An anchor or riding light is an all:round light.

Meaning of COTTON WOOL

COTTON WOOL means: Cotton wool is London Cockney rhyming slang for hunting for sexual quarry (pull).

Meaning of Tippex

Tippex means: n whiteout; Liquid Paper. You know, the stuff that you use to paint over mistakes you’ve made on bits of paper. The stuff that smells good. Fuck, that’s good. Look at the pretty colours. Who wants popcorn?

Meaning of BULLS WOOL

BULLS WOOL means: Bulls wool is Black−American slang for stolen clothes.

Meaning of Pea Coat

Pea Coat means: A mid-calf length heavy wool overcoat worn by US Sailors. The Pea Coat was originally made of "Pilot Cloth", a material similar to melton, and thus the garment was originally named a "P-Coat".

Meaning of Masthead Light

Masthead Light means: Also known as a steaming light. The masthead light is a white light that is visible for an arc extending across the forward 225° of the boat. When lit the masthead light indicates that a vessel under power, including sailboats with engines running. Masthead lights are usually located halfway up the mast rather than at the top.

Meaning of Tidy and neat means street....nip down the tidy for me and get me a linen.....means nip down the street and get me a newspaper(linen draper)

Tidy and neat means street....nip down the tidy for me and get me a linen.....means nip down the street and get me a newspaper(linen draper) means:

Meaning of TOQUE

TOQUE means: A wool hat warn during winter. Called a Beanie in most other places. "It's cold outside, you should put on a Toque and some Mits."

Meaning of Too good for you, you mongrel

Too good for you, you mongrel means: A light hearted expression amongst friends. Meaning, I'm more deserving of this (thing) than you! Made famous in a television show by the respected Australian actor, Paul Hogan

Meaning of Satinet

Satinet means: A twilled cloth made of cotton and wool.

Meaning of Fixed Light

Fixed Light means: A navigational light with a steady beam of light, having no intervals of darkness.

Meaning of Tricolor Light

Tricolor Light means: A running light allowed on some sailboats instead of the normal bow and stern lights. The tricolor light contains the red and green side lights and the white stern light in a single fitting that is attached to the top of the mast.

Meaning of Linen Draper

Linen Draper means: Newspaper

Meaning of Flashing Light

Flashing Light means: Used to describe a light that blinks on and off, where the period of light is shorter than the period of darkness separating the flashes.

Meaning of Linsey-woolsey

Linsey-woolsey means: Cloth made of linen and wool, mixed.

Meaning of Linsey-woolsey

Linsey-woolsey means: Made of linen and wool; hence, of different and unsuitable parts; mean.

Meaning of Ticklenburg

Ticklenburg means: A coarse, mixed linen fabric made to be sold in the West Indies.

Meaning of Borrel

Borrel means: A kind of light stuff, of silk and wool.

Meaning of Make

Make means: To become; to be, or to be capable of being, changed or fashioned into; to do the part or office of; to furnish the material for; as, he will make a good musician; sweet cider makes sour vinegar; wool makes warm clothing.

Meaning of Fringe

Fringe means: An ornamental appendage to the border of a piece of stuff, originally consisting of the ends of the warp, projecting beyond the woven fabric; but more commonly made separate and sewed on, consisting sometimes of projecting ends, twisted or plaited together, and sometimes of loose threads of wool, silk, or linen, or narrow strips of leather, or the like.

Meaning of Felt

Felt means: A cloth or stuff made of matted fibers of wool, or wool and fur, fulled or wrought into a compact substance by rolling and pressure, with lees or size, without spinning or weaving.

Meaning of Linen

Linen means: Made of linen; as, linen cloth; a linen stocking.

Meaning of Crepon

Crepon means: A thin stuff made of the finest wool or silk, or of wool and silk.

Meaning of Stuff

Stuff means: Woven material not made into garments; fabric of any kind; specifically, any one of various fabrics of wool or worsted; sometimes, worsted fiber.

Meaning of Braid

Braid means: A narrow fabric, as of wool, silk, or linen, used for binding, trimming, or ornamenting dresses, etc.

Meaning of Linen

Linen means: Underclothing, esp. the shirt, as being, in former times, chiefly made of linen.

Meaning of Sagathy

Sagathy means: A mixed woven fabric of silk and cotton, or silk and wool; sayette; also, a light woolen fabric.

Meaning of From

From means: Out of the neighborhood of; lessening or losing proximity to; leaving behind; by reason of; out of; by aid of; -- used whenever departure, setting out, commencement of action, being, state, occurrence, etc., or procedure, emanation, absence, separation, etc., are to be expressed. It is construed with, and indicates, the point of space or time at which the action, state, etc., are regarded as setting out or beginning; also, less frequently, the source, the cause, the occasion, out of which anything proceeds; -- the aritithesis and correlative of to; as, it, is one hundred miles from Boston to Springfield; he took his sword from his side; light proceeds from the sun; separate the coarse wool from the fine; men have all sprung from Adam, and often go from good to bad, and from bad to worse; the merit of an action depends on the principle from which it proceeds; men judge of facts from personal knowledge, or from testimony.

Meaning of Metonymy

Metonymy means: A trope in which one word is put for another that suggests it; as, we say, a man keeps a good table instead of good provisions; we read Virgil, that is, his poems; a man has a warm heart, that is, warm affections.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Double

Double means: Twice as much; twice the number, sum, quantity, length, value, and the like.

Meaning of Kitchen

Kitchen means: A cookroom; the room of a house appropriated to cookery.

Meaning of Matronly

Matronly means: Like, or befitting, a matron; grave; sedate.

Meaning of Metric

Metric means: Of or pertaining to the meter as a standard of measurement; of or pertaining to the decimal system of measurement of which a meter is the unit; as, the metric system; a metric measurement.

Meaning of Tack

Tack means: A rope used to hold in place the foremost lower corners of the courses when the vessel is closehauled (see Illust. of Ship); also, a rope employed to pull the lower corner of a studding sail to the boom.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of FORTY SNOOZEWINKS

FORTY SNOOZEWINKS means: Forty snoozewinks is slang for a short sleep.

Meaning of LAGERED UP

LAGERED UP means: Lagered Up is British slang for drunk, intoxicated.

Meaning of Stone Me

Stone Me means: Very happy, delighted

Meaning of ON ICE

ON ICE means: in prison

Meaning of okay | OK

okay | OK means: all right, acceptable

Tags: Slang Meaning of A corruption of linen and wool. Material made of linen and wool mixed, light or coarse stuff. "He gave them coats of linsey woolsey, which were good and warm for winter, and good and light for summer.. The slang definition of A corruption of linen and wool. Material made of linen and wool mixed, light or coarse stuff. "He gave them coats of linsey woolsey, which were good and warm for winter, and good and light for summer.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of A corruption of linen and wool. Material made of linen and wool mixed, light or coarse stuff. "He gave them coats of linsey woolsey, which were good and warm for winter, and good and light for summer.? Please, add a definition of A corruption of linen and wool. Material made of linen and wool mixed, light or coarse stuff. "He gave them coats of linsey woolsey, which were good and warm for winter, and good and light for summer. if you did not find one from a search of A corruption of linen and wool. Material made of linen and wool mixed, light or coarse stuff. "He gave them coats of linsey woolsey, which were good and warm for winter, and good and light for summer..

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