Slang meaning of BAREFOOT

BAREFOOT means: Car or engine without brakes. (Many locomotives built in the 1860's and 1870's were not equipped with brakes except on the tank)

What is the slang meaning/definition of BAREFOOT ?

BAREFOOT means: Car or engine without brakes. (Many locomotives built in the 1860's and 1870's were not equipped with brakes except on the tank)

Slang definition of BAREFOOT

BAREFOOT means: Car or engine without brakes. (Many locomotives built in the 1860's and 1870's were not equipped with brakes except on the tank)

More meanings / definitions of Car or engine without brakes. (Many locomotives built in the 1860's and 1870's were not equipped with brakes except on the tank) or words, sentences containing Car or engine without brakes. (Many locomotives built in the 1860's and 1870's were not equipped with brakes except on the tank)?

Brakeman (n.): A man in charge of a brake or brakes.

Braky (a.): Full of brakes; abounding with brambles, shrubs, or ferns; rough; thorny.

Engine (v. t.): To equip with an engine; -- said especially of steam vessels; as, vessels are often built by one firm and engined by another.

Link motion (): A valve gear, consisting of two eccentrics with their rods, giving motion to a slide valve by an adjustable connecting bar, called the link, in such a way that the motion of the engine can be reversed, or the cut-off varied, at will; -- used very generally in locomotives and marine engines.

Water engine (): An engine to raise water; or an engine moved by water; also, an engine or machine for extinguishing fires; a fire engine.

Built (a.): Formed; shaped; constructed; made; -- often used in composition and preceded by the word denoting the form; as, frigate-built, clipper-built, etc.

Frigate (n.): Originally, a vessel of the Mediterranean propelled by sails and by oars. The French, about 1650, transferred the name to larger vessels, and by 1750 it had been appropriated for a class of war vessels intermediate between corvettes and ships of the line. Frigates, from about 1750 to 1850, had one full battery deck and, often, a spar deck with a lighter battery. They carried sometimes as many as fifty guns. After the application of steam to navigation steam frigates of largely increased size and power were built, and formed the main part of the navies of the world till about 1870, when the introduction of ironclads superseded them.

Engineer (n.): One who manages as engine, particularly a steam engine; an engine driver.

Jerry-built (a.): Built hastily and of bad materials; as, jerry-built houses.

Air-built (a.): Erected in the air; having no solid foundation; chimerical; as, an air-built castle.

Cloud-built (a.): Built of, or in, the clouds; airy; unsubstantial; imaginary.

Built (n.): Shape; build; form of structure; as, the built of a ship.

Clincher-built (a.): See Clinker-built.

Confederate (n.): A name designating an adherent to the cause of the States which attempted to withdraw from the Union (1860-1865).

Air engine (): An engine driven by heated or by compressed air.

Turntable (n.): A large revolving platform, for turning railroad cars, locomotives, etc., in a different direction; -- called also turnplate.

Frigate-built (a.): Built like a frigate with a raised quarter-deck and forecastle.

Duty (n.): The efficiency of an engine, especially a steam pumping engine, as measured by work done by a certain quantity of fuel; usually, the number of pounds of water lifted one foot by one bushel of coal (94 lbs. old standard), or by 1 cwt. (112 lbs., England, or 100 lbs., United States).

Equipped (imp. & p. p.): of Equip

Sinewed (a.): Fig.: Equipped; strengthened.

Outrigger (n.): A boat thus equipped.

Undersailed (a.): Inadequately equipped with sails.

Unsoldiered (a.): Not equipped like a soldier; unsoldierlike.

Refrigeratory (n.): The chamber, or tank, in which ice is formed, in an ice machine.

Indicator (n.): An instrument which draws a diagram showing the varying pressure in the cylinder of an engine or pump at every point of the stroke. It consists of a small cylinder communicating with the engine cylinder and fitted with a piston which the varying pressure drives upward more or less against the resistance of a spring. A lever imparts motion to a pencil which traces the diagram on a card wrapped around a vertical drum which is turned back and forth by a string connected with the piston rod of the engine. See Indicator card (below).

Power (n.): The rate at which mechanical energy is exerted or mechanical work performed, as by an engine or other machine, or an animal, working continuously; as, an engine of twenty horse power.

Trunk (n.): A large pipe forming the piston rod of a steam engine, of sufficient diameter to allow one end of the connecting rod to be attached to the crank, and the other end to pass within the pipe directly to the piston, thus making the engine more compact.

Roching cask (): A tank in which alum is crystallized from a solution.

Top-armor (n.): A top railing supported by stanchions and equipped with netting.

Weaponed (a.): Furnished with weapons, or arms; armed; equipped.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Car or engine without brakes. (Many locomotives built in the 1860's and 1870's were not equipped with brakes except on the tank)?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Car or engine without brakes. (Many locomotives built in the 1860's and 1870's were not equipped with brakes except on the tank)

Meaning of BAREFOOT

BAREFOOT means: Car or engine without brakes. (Many locomotives built in the 1860's and 1870's were not equipped with brakes except on the tank)

Meaning of DEAD MAN'S THROTTLE

DEAD MAN'S THROTTLE means: Throttle that requires pressure of operator's hand or foot to prevent power shut-off and application of brakes. An engine so equipped would stop instantly if the operator fell dead. Also called dead man's button

Meaning of Pump yo brakes

Pump yo brakes means: v. 1.to stop whatever it is you're doing or are about to do.  "I'm bout to go holla at Kianna." " Ay, dawg. Pump yo brakes, she a gold digga." 

Meaning of gambo

gambo means: A box-cart, built by ourselves for racing downhill, usually on the pavement, at breakneck speed. Very dangerous for pedestrians! Usually no brakes.

Meaning of WIND

WIND means: Air brakes

Meaning of BINDERS

BINDERS means: Hand brakes

Meaning of HORSE 'ER OVER

HORSE 'ER OVER means: Reverse the engine. This is done by compressed air on modern locomotives, but in early days, manually operated reversing equipment required considerable jockeying to reverse an engine while in motion

Meaning of tommy tank

tommy tank means: Rhyming slang for masturbation, i.e. Tommy Tank = wank. derived from the children's TV programme 'Thomas The Tank Engine'.

Meaning of Boards Out

Boards Out means: Speed brakes extended

Meaning of WING HER

WING HER means: Set brakes on moving train

Meaning of HEEL

HEEL means: Cars on end of tracks with brakes applied

Meaning of SHAKING THE TRAIN

SHAKING THE TRAIN means: Putting on air brakes in emergency

Meaning of TRAIN LINE

TRAIN LINE means: Pipe that carries compressed air to operate air brakes

Meaning of PULL THE AIR

PULL THE AIR means: Set brakes by opening conductor's valve or angle cock

Meaning of ANCHOR THEM

ANCHOR THEM means: Set hand brakes on still cars; the opposite is release anchors

Meaning of SAP

SAP means: Same as brake club; also called the staff of ignorance. To set hand brakes is to sap up some binders

Meaning of SKATE

SKATE means: Shoe placed on rail in hump yard to stop cars with defective brakes

Meaning of STI

STI means: adj. "Shimano Total Integration" - a marketing ploy that forces you to buy new brakes when you replace your shifters.

Meaning of DECKORATE

DECKORATE means: Get out on top of freight cars to set hand brakes or receive or transmit signals. Derived from deck

Meaning of speak oh toothless wonder

speak oh toothless wonder means: A statement made after someone brakes wind; fart, expels flatulence gas throught the anus.

Meaning of Brakeman

Brakeman means: A man in charge of a brake or brakes.

Meaning of Braky

Braky means: Full of brakes; abounding with brambles, shrubs, or ferns; rough; thorny.

Meaning of Engine

Engine means: To equip with an engine; -- said especially of steam vessels; as, vessels are often built by one firm and engined by another.

Meaning of Link motion

Link motion means: A valve gear, consisting of two eccentrics with their rods, giving motion to a slide valve by an adjustable connecting bar, called the link, in such a way that the motion of the engine can be reversed, or the cut-off varied, at will; -- used very generally in locomotives and marine engines.

Meaning of Water engine

Water engine means: An engine to raise water; or an engine moved by water; also, an engine or machine for extinguishing fires; a fire engine.

Meaning of Built

Built means: Formed; shaped; constructed; made; -- often used in composition and preceded by the word denoting the form; as, frigate-built, clipper-built, etc.

Meaning of Frigate

Frigate means: Originally, a vessel of the Mediterranean propelled by sails and by oars. The French, about 1650, transferred the name to larger vessels, and by 1750 it had been appropriated for a class of war vessels intermediate between corvettes and ships of the line. Frigates, from about 1750 to 1850, had one full battery deck and, often, a spar deck with a lighter battery. They carried sometimes as many as fifty guns. After the application of steam to navigation steam frigates of largely increased size and power were built, and formed the main part of the navies of the world till about 1870, when the introduction of ironclads superseded them.

Meaning of Engineer

Engineer means: One who manages as engine, particularly a steam engine; an engine driver.

Meaning of Jerry-built

Jerry-built means: Built hastily and of bad materials; as, jerry-built houses.

Meaning of Air-built

Air-built means: Erected in the air; having no solid foundation; chimerical; as, an air-built castle.

Meaning of Cloud-built

Cloud-built means: Built of, or in, the clouds; airy; unsubstantial; imaginary.

Meaning of Built

Built means: Shape; build; form of structure; as, the built of a ship.

Meaning of Clincher-built

Clincher-built means: See Clinker-built.

Meaning of Confederate

Confederate means: A name designating an adherent to the cause of the States which attempted to withdraw from the Union (1860-1865).

Meaning of Air engine

Air engine means: An engine driven by heated or by compressed air.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Broadmouth

Broadmouth means: One of the Eurylaimidae, a family of East Indian passerine birds.

Meaning of Evacuated

Evacuated means: of Evacuate

Meaning of Foreordain

Foreordain means: To ordain or appoint beforehand; to preordain; to predestinate; to predetermine.

Meaning of Neat

Neat means: Free from what is unbecoming, inappropriate, or tawdry; simple and becoming; pleasing with simplicity; tasteful; chaste; as, a neat style; a neat dress.

Meaning of Sacramentize

Sacramentize means: To administer the sacraments.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of ERROL FLYNN

ERROL FLYNN means: Errol Flynn is London Cockney rhyming slang for bin. Errol Flynn is London Cockney rhyming slang for chin.

Meaning of GAMS

GAMS means: Gams is British slang for legs.Gams is American tramp slang for a girls legs.

Meaning of SPORRAN

SPORRAN means: Sporran is British slang for pubic hair.

Meaning of FLAG

FLAG means: appearance of blood in the vein

Meaning of Suntan

Suntan means: Refers to their dark skin color.

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