Slang meaning of CUT

CUT means: Several cars attached to an engine or coupled together by themselves. Also that part of the right-of-way which is excavated out of a hill or mountain instead of running up over it or being tunneled through it

What is the slang meaning/definition of CUT ?

CUT means: Several cars attached to an engine or coupled together by themselves. Also that part of the right-of-way which is excavated out of a hill or mountain instead of running up over it or being tunneled through it

Slang definition of CUT

CUT means: Several cars attached to an engine or coupled together by themselves. Also that part of the right-of-way which is excavated out of a hill or mountain instead of running up over it or being tunneled through it

More meanings / definitions of Several cars attached to an engine or coupled together by themselves. Also that part of the right-of-way which is excavated out of a hill or mountain instead of running up over it or being tunneled through it or words, sentences containing Several cars attached to an engine or coupled together by themselves. Also that part of the right-of-way which is excavated out of a hill or mountain instead of running up over it or being tunneled through it?

Peak (n.): The top, or one of the tops, of a hill, mountain, or range, ending in a point; often, the whole hill or mountain, esp. when isolated; as, the Peak of Teneriffe.

Volcano (n.): A mountain or hill, usually more or less conical in form, from which lava, cinders, steam, sulphur gases, and the like, are ejected; -- often popularly called a burning mountain.

Foot (n.): The lowest part or base; the ground part; the bottom, as of a mountain or column; also, the last of a row or series; the end or extremity, esp. if associated with inferiority; as, the foot of a hill; the foot of the procession; the foot of a class; the foot of the bed.

Crosshead (n.): A beam or bar across the head or end of a rod, etc., or a block attached to it and carrying a knuckle pin; as the solid crosspiece running between parallel slides, which receives motion from the piston of a steam engine and imparts it to the connecting rod, which is hinged to the crosshead.

Mountain (a.): Of or pertaining to a mountain or mountains; growing or living on a mountain; found on or peculiar to mountains; among mountains; as, a mountain torrent; mountain pines; mountain goats; mountain air; mountain howitzer.

Mount (v.): A mass of earth, or earth and rock, rising considerably above the common surface of the surrounding land; a mountain; a high hill; -- used always instead of mountain, when put before a proper name; as, Mount Washington; otherwise, chiefly in poetry.

Crest (n.): The summit of a hill or mountain ridge.

Holdback (n.): The projection or loop on the thill of a vehicle. to which a strap of the harness is attached, to hold back a carriage when going down hill, or in backing; also, the strap or part of the harness so used.

Trunk (n.): A large pipe forming the piston rod of a steam engine, of sufficient diameter to allow one end of the connecting rod to be attached to the crank, and the other end to pass within the pipe directly to the piston, thus making the engine more compact.

Landslide (n.): The slipping down of a mass of land from a mountain, hill, etc.

Skid (n.): A shoe or clog, as of iron, attached to a chain, and placed under the wheel of a wagon to prevent its turning when descending a steep hill; a drag; a skidpan; also, by extension, a hook attached to a chain, and used for the same purpose.

Height (n.): That which is elevated; an eminence; a hill or mountain; as, Alpine heights.

Water engine (): An engine to raise water; or an engine moved by water; also, an engine or machine for extinguishing fires; a fire engine.

Pound (v. i.): To make a jarring noise, as in running; as, the engine pounds.

Boss (n.): The enlarged part of a shaft, on which a wheel is keyed, or at the end, where it is coupled to another.

Steep (n.): A precipitous place, hill, mountain, rock, or ascent; any elevated object sloping with a large angle to the plane of the horizon; a precipice.

Moot-hill (n.): A hill of meeting or council; an elevated place in the open air where public assemblies or courts were held by the Saxons; -- called, in Scotland, mute-hill.

Attache (v. t.): One attached to another person or thing, as a part of a suite or staff. Specifically: One attached to an embassy.

Hill (n.): A natural elevation of land, or a mass of earth rising above the common level of the surrounding land; an eminence less than a mountain.

Knob (n.): A rounded hill or mountain; as, the Pilot Knob.

Haulage (n.): Act of hauling; as, the haulage of cars by an engine; charge for hauling.

Bed (n.): The foundation or the more solid and fixed part or framing of a machine; or a part on which something is laid or supported; as, the bed of an engine.

Switch (n.): A movable part of a rail; or of opposite rails, for transferring cars from one track to another.

Tunneled (imp. & p. p.): of Tunnel

Locomotive (n.): A locomotive engine; a self-propelling wheel carriage, especially one which bears a steam boiler and one or more steam engines which communicate motion to the wheels and thus propel the carriage, -- used to convey goods or passengers, or to draw wagons, railroad cars, etc. See Illustration in Appendix.

Engineer (n.): One who manages as engine, particularly a steam engine; an engine driver.

Counter (v. t.): A telltale; a contrivance attached to an engine, printing press, or other machine, for the purpose of counting the revolutions or the pulsations.

Hank (n.): A ring or eye of rope, wood, or iron, attached to the edge of a sail and running on a stay.

Back (n.): The part opposite to, or most remote from, that which fronts the speaker or actor; or the part out of sight, or not generally seen; as, the back of an island, of a hill, or of a village.

Running (a.): Successive; one following the other without break or intervention; -- said of periods of time; as, to be away two days running; to sow land two years running.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Several cars attached to an engine or coupled together by themselves. Also that part of the right-of-way which is excavated out of a hill or mountain instead of running up over it or being tunneled through it?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Several cars attached to an engine or coupled together by themselves. Also that part of the right-of-way which is excavated out of a hill or mountain instead of running up over it or being tunneled through it

Meaning of CUT

CUT means: Several cars attached to an engine or coupled together by themselves. Also that part of the right-of-way which is excavated out of a hill or mountain instead of running up over it or being tunneled through it

Meaning of LIGHT ENGINE

LIGHT ENGINE means: An engine moving outside the yard without cars attached

Meaning of FLYING SWITCH

FLYING SWITCH means: Switching technique in which the engine pulls away from a car or cars she has started rolling, permitting them to be switched onto a track other than that taken by the engine. The switch is thrown instantly after the engine has passed it and just before the cars reach it. This procedure, common in bygone days, is now frowned upon by officials

Meaning of Sea Chest

Sea Chest means: 1. A watertight compartment in the lowest part of the ship to which valves and piping are attached to allow water in for ballast, engine cooling, and firefighting purposes. 2. A wooden box used to store a sailor's effects.

Meaning of STRING

STRING means: Several cars coupled together; also a telegraph wire

Meaning of big end

big end means: n the end of the conrod, which is attached to the crankshaft in a conventional combustion engine. The other end, attached to the piston, is called the “small end.”

Meaning of DEAD MAN'S HOLE

DEAD MAN'S HOLE means: Method of righting an overturned engine or car. A six-foot hole is dug about forty feet from the engine or car, long enough to hold a large solid-oak plank. A trench is then dug up to the engine and heavy ropes laid in it, with a four-sheave block, or pulley, at the lower end of the engine and a three-sheave block at the top of the boiler. Chains are fastened to the underside of the engine and hooked to the three-sheave block. The free end of the rope is then hooked to the drawbar of a road engine. The hole is filled-packed hard to hold the "dead man" down against the coming pull. When the engine moves up the track she pulls ropes over the top of the boiler of the overturned locomotive on the chains that are fastened to the lower part, rolling the engine over sidewise and onto her wheels again

Meaning of bonnet

bonnet means: n hood of a car; the part of a car which covers the engine. Confusion arises in the U.K. when dealing with rear-engined cars; it’s difficult to determine whether to call it a bonnet or, as seems perhaps more logical, a boot, on account of it being at the back. The trials of modern life. To encourage confusion, “hood” is used in the U.K. to describe the convertible top of a convertible car.

Meaning of ROOF GARDEN

ROOF GARDEN means: Mallet-type locomotive or any helper engine on a mountain job. Sometimes called sacred ox

Meaning of STAKE

STAKE means: Pole used in dangerous and now rare method of switching. A cut of cars was shoved by a stake attached to the car immediately in front of the engine. This method was supposed to be superior to the ordinary method of "batting them out" because there was less wear and tear on drawbars and less damage to freight; but the human casualties that resulted gave more than one yard the nickname "slaughterhouse." Another meaning of stake is the money a boomer saved on a job so he could resign and continue eating regularly while looking for another job

Meaning of MAG-16

MAG-16 means: Marine Air Group 16, attached to the 1st MAW, the First Marine Aircraft Wing. They were stationed just south of Da Nang, near Marble Mountain.

Meaning of RUN LIGHT

RUN LIGHT means: For an engine to run on the tracks without any cars

Meaning of 5 - 0

5 - 0 means: n. (pronounced "five oh") A policeman or the police. 5-0 was derived here in Cali with artists like Too $hort, Spice 1, and NWA. It comes from the old school Highway Patrol cars which were 5.0 Mustangs back in the late 80's and 90's, hence the term 5-0. It was also coupled with the term used in the television show Hawaii Five-O.  "Watch out! 5-0!" 

Meaning of dynamo

dynamo means: n generator. Usually on a car or bicycle, this is a device intended to take power from the engine to recharge your battery as you drive along (or power the lights, in the case of a bicycle). Or, in the case of my own fine automobile, take power from the engine and dribble it lazily into the ether. These days, dynamos on cars have been replaced by alternators. Alternators run on alternating current as opposed to direct current and are more effective at charging the battery at low revs. Why, you might wonder, do some of the parts of this book that relate to cars appear to have a lot more effort put into them than other parts? Well, I’m a car person. I’m much more interested in car words than I am in words that mean “sheetrock” or “faucet.” If you’re a sheetrock person then I’m sure there’s a book out there somewhere for you.

Meaning of GRAB IRON

GRAB IRON means: Steel bar attached to cars and engines as a hand bold

Meaning of SMOKE or SMOKE AGENT

SMOKE or SMOKE AGENT means: Locomotive fireman. Smoker is engine or firebox. Smoking 'em or running on smoke orders is a dangerous method, now obsolete, of running a train from one station or siding to another without orders from the dispatcher. You moved cautiously, continually watching for the smoke of any train that might be approaching you on the same track

Meaning of BATTING 'EM OUT

BATTING 'EM OUT means: Used generally by switchmen when a yard engine is switching a string of cars

Meaning of DROP

DROP means: Switching movement in which cars are cut off from an engine and allowed to coast to their places. (See hump)

Meaning of Engine Order Telegraph

Engine Order Telegraph means: A set of mechanical signaling devices, connected by cables, by which engine commands are passed from the pilot house to the engine room and by which the engine room responds.

Meaning of MTB

MTB means: n. the activity of MounTain Biking. Or a mountain bike itself. v. "MTBing". See ATB, OHV, ORV, VTT.

Meaning of Peak

Peak means: The top, or one of the tops, of a hill, mountain, or range, ending in a point; often, the whole hill or mountain, esp. when isolated; as, the Peak of Teneriffe.

Meaning of Volcano

Volcano means: A mountain or hill, usually more or less conical in form, from which lava, cinders, steam, sulphur gases, and the like, are ejected; -- often popularly called a burning mountain.

Meaning of Foot

Foot means: The lowest part or base; the ground part; the bottom, as of a mountain or column; also, the last of a row or series; the end or extremity, esp. if associated with inferiority; as, the foot of a hill; the foot of the procession; the foot of a class; the foot of the bed.

Meaning of Crosshead

Crosshead means: A beam or bar across the head or end of a rod, etc., or a block attached to it and carrying a knuckle pin; as the solid crosspiece running between parallel slides, which receives motion from the piston of a steam engine and imparts it to the connecting rod, which is hinged to the crosshead.

Meaning of Mountain

Mountain means: Of or pertaining to a mountain or mountains; growing or living on a mountain; found on or peculiar to mountains; among mountains; as, a mountain torrent; mountain pines; mountain goats; mountain air; mountain howitzer.

Meaning of Mount

Mount means: A mass of earth, or earth and rock, rising considerably above the common surface of the surrounding land; a mountain; a high hill; -- used always instead of mountain, when put before a proper name; as, Mount Washington; otherwise, chiefly in poetry.

Meaning of Crest

Crest means: The summit of a hill or mountain ridge.

Meaning of Holdback

Holdback means: The projection or loop on the thill of a vehicle. to which a strap of the harness is attached, to hold back a carriage when going down hill, or in backing; also, the strap or part of the harness so used.

Meaning of Trunk

Trunk means: A large pipe forming the piston rod of a steam engine, of sufficient diameter to allow one end of the connecting rod to be attached to the crank, and the other end to pass within the pipe directly to the piston, thus making the engine more compact.

Meaning of Landslide

Landslide means: The slipping down of a mass of land from a mountain, hill, etc.

Meaning of Skid

Skid means: A shoe or clog, as of iron, attached to a chain, and placed under the wheel of a wagon to prevent its turning when descending a steep hill; a drag; a skidpan; also, by extension, a hook attached to a chain, and used for the same purpose.

Meaning of Height

Height means: That which is elevated; an eminence; a hill or mountain; as, Alpine heights.

Meaning of Water engine

Water engine means: An engine to raise water; or an engine moved by water; also, an engine or machine for extinguishing fires; a fire engine.

Meaning of Pound

Pound means: To make a jarring noise, as in running; as, the engine pounds.

Meaning of Boss

Boss means: The enlarged part of a shaft, on which a wheel is keyed, or at the end, where it is coupled to another.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Beggar

Beggar means: One who makes it his business to ask alms.

Meaning of Fibril

Fibril means: A small fiber; the branch of a fiber; a very slender thread; a fibrilla.

Meaning of Lenticulas

Lenticulas means: of Lenticula

Meaning of Turio

Turio means: A shoot or sprout from the ground.

Meaning of Versability

Versability means: The quality or state of being versable.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of fiddle-de-dee

fiddle-de-dee means: Nonsense! Fiddle-de-dee! You can't run a mile in four minutes!

Meaning of camp

camp means: Was for many years the term of choice in the UK for describing the 'characteristic homosexual behaviours' such as assumed effeminacy but was supplanted by the US term 'gay'. Hence the expression to 'camp it up', and the 'hidden' joke in the film title 'Carry on Camping'. The word (and many other underground gay terms) was popularised and brought to general public attention and useage by the late 1950's radio show 'Round the Horne'.

Meaning of taking the mick, taking the piss

taking the mick, taking the piss means: Being cheeky or rude in a lighthearted way. Poking fun at someone.

Meaning of Jezebel

Jezebel means: Unrestrained homosexual, uncontrollable desire by a man for sexual intercourse one that needs to have sex all the time.

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