Slang meaning of FLAT

FLAT means: Flatcar. Also called car with the top blowed off

What is the slang meaning/definition of FLAT ?

FLAT means: Flatcar. Also called car with the top blowed off

Slang definition of FLAT

FLAT means: Flatcar. Also called car with the top blowed off

More meanings / definitions of Flatcar. Also called car with the top blowed off or words, sentences containing Flatcar. Also called car with the top blowed off?

So-called (a.): So named; called by such a name (but perhaps called thus with doubtful propriety).

Impatiens (n.): A genus of plants, several species of which have very beautiful flowers; -- so called because the elastic capsules burst when touched, and scatter the seeds with considerable force. Called also touch-me-not, jewelweed, and snapweed. I. Balsamina (sometimes called lady's slipper) is the common garden balsam.

Hemoglobin (n.): The normal coloring matter of the red blood corpuscles of vertebrate animals. It is composed of hematin and globulin, and is also called haematoglobulin. In arterial blood, it is always combined with oxygen, and is then called oxyhemoglobin. It crystallizes under different forms from different animals, and when crystallized, is called haematocrystallin. See Blood crystal, under Blood.

Blackcoat (n.): A clergyman; -- familiarly so called, as a soldier is sometimes called a redcoat or a bluecoat.

Gyp (n.): A college servant; -- so called in Cambridge, England; at Oxford called a scout.

Knapweed (n.): The black centaury (Centaurea nigra); -- so called from the knoblike heads of flowers. Called also bullweed.

Honewort (n.): An umbelliferous plant of the genus Sison (S. Amomum); -- so called because used to cure a swelling called a hone.

Gade (n.): A pike, so called at Moray Firth; -- called also gead.

Postman (n.): One of the two most experienced barristers in the Court of Exchequer, who have precedence in motions; -- so called from the place where he sits. The other of the two is called the tubman.

Scout (n.): A college student's or undergraduate's servant; -- so called in Oxford, England; at Cambridge called a gyp; and at Dublin, a skip.

Polychroite (n.): The coloring matter of saffron; -- formerly so called because of the change of color on treatment with certain acids; -- called also crocin, and safranin.

Rapparee (n.): A wild Irish plunderer, esp. one of the 17th century; -- so called from his carrying a half-pike, called a rapary.

Acalephae (n. pl.): A group of Coelenterata, including the Medusae or jellyfishes, and hydroids; -- so called from the stinging power they possess. Sometimes called sea nettles.

Denarius (n.): A Roman silver coin of the value of about fourteen cents; the "penny" of the New Testament; -- so called from being worth originally ten of the pieces called as.

Hendecane (n.): A hydrocarbon, C11H24, of the paraffin series; -- so called because it has eleven atoms of carbon in each molecule. Called also endecane, undecane.

Swallowtail (n.): An outwork with converging sides, its head or front forming a reentrant angle; -- so called from its form. Called also priestcap.

Inch (n.): A measure of length, the twelfth part of a foot, commonly subdivided into halves, quarters, eights, sixteenths, etc., as among mechanics. It was also formerly divided into twelve parts, called lines, and originally into three parts, called barleycorns, its length supposed to have been determined from three grains of barley placed end to end lengthwise. It is also sometimes called a prime ('), composed of twelve seconds (''), as in the duodecimal system of arithmetic.

Chewink (n.): An american bird (Pipilo erythrophthalmus) of the Finch family, so called from its note; -- called also towhee bunting and ground robin.

Setterwort (n.): The bear's-foot (Helleborus f/tidus); -- so called because the root was used in settering, or inserting setons into the dewlaps of cattle. Called also pegroots.

Circle (n.): A plane figure, bounded by a single curve line called its circumference, every part of which is equally distant from a point within it, called the center.

Commandery (n.): A district or a manor with lands and tenements appertaining thereto, under the control of a member of an order of knights who was called a commander; -- called also a preceptory.

Hematite (n.): An important ore of iron, the sesquioxide, so called because of the red color of the powder. It occurs in splendent rhombohedral crystals, and in massive and earthy forms; -- the last called red ocher. Called also specular iron, oligist iron, rhombohedral iron ore, and bloodstone. See Brown hematite, under Brown.

Counterfoil (n.): That part of a tally, formerly in the exchequer, which was kept by an officer in that court, the other, called the stock, being delivered to the person who had lent the king money on the account; -- called also counterstock.

Pyrocatechin (n.): A white crystalline substance, C6H4(OH)2, of the phenol series, found in various plants; -- so called because first obtained by distillation of gum catechu. Called also catechol, oxyphenol. etc.

Soapwort (n.): A common plant (Saponaria officinalis) of the Pink family; -- so called because its bruised leaves, when agitated in water, produce a lather like that from soap. Called also Bouncing Bet.

Fishhawk (n.): The osprey (Pandion haliaetus), found both in Europe and America; -- so called because it plunges into the water and seizes fishes in its talons. Called also fishing eagle, and bald buzzard.

Wireworm (n.): One of the larvae of various species of snapping beetles, or elaters; -- so called from their slenderness and the uncommon hardness of the integument. Wireworms are sometimes very destructive to the roots of plants. Called also wire grub.

Mannite (n.): A white crystalline substance of a sweet taste obtained from a so-called manna, the dried sap of the flowering ash (Fraxinus ornus); -- called also mannitol, and hydroxy hexane. Cf. Dulcite.

Lachrymatory (n.): A "tear-bottle;" a narrow-necked vessel found in sepulchers of the ancient Romans; -- so called from a former notion that the tears of the deceased person's friends were collected in it. Called also lachrymal or lacrymal.

Eristalis (n.): A genus of dipterous insects whose young (called rat-tailed larvae) are remarkable for their long tapering tail, which spiracles at the tip, and for their ability to live in very impure and salt waters; -- also called drone fly.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Flatcar. Also called car with the top blowed off?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Flatcar. Also called car with the top blowed off

Meaning of FLAT

FLAT means: Flatcar. Also called car with the top blowed off

Meaning of IDLER

IDLER means: An unloaded flatcar placed before or after a car from which oversize machinery, pipe, or other material projects

Meaning of CAG

CAG means: Commander of the air group (coined in the pre1962 days when they were called air groups — now they’re called air wings) — the carrier’s chief pilot.

Meaning of Quid

Quid means: - A pound in money is called a quid. It is the equivalent to the buck or clam in America. A five pound note is called a fiver and a ten pound note is called a tenner.

Meaning of Quid

Quid means: A pound in money is called a quid. It is the equivalent to the buck or clam in America. A five pound note is called a fiver and a ten pound note is called a tenner.

Meaning of jigger

jigger means: An alley behind rows of terraced houses in the Merseyside part of Lancs. Also sometimes called a "Jowler"..."back-entry" or if it is one of the "posh" kind and very broad?(usually they are only about 3 feet wide!!) they where called "Widey's",

Meaning of HOTBOX

HOTBOX means: Overheated journal or bearing. Also called hub. This was a frequent cause of delay in the old days but is virtually nonexistent on trains that are completely equipped with ball-bearings. Trainmen are sometimes called hotbox detectors

Meaning of dodgy yox

dodgy yox means: Cross-eyed. Apparantly derived from something said by the contributors father when he saw a boy called Mark Didd (formally Collen) whose eye pointed away from his gaze. Also called him Boss-eyed or Bock-eyed for a while.

Meaning of strike

strike means: a sovereign (early 1700s) and later, a pound, based on the coin minting process which is called 'striking' a coin, so called because of the stamping process used in making coins.

Meaning of COMPANY

COMPANY means: a company is an organizational institution commanded by a captain and consisting of two or more platoons. It varies widely in size according to its mission. An artillery company is called a battery, and a cavalry company is called a troop. Pg. 95

Meaning of ten-pinter

ten-pinter means: Someone you'd only find attractive after drinking ten pints. (ed: I had a mate in Caerffili called Doug who once had a girlfriend he called 'the beast'. She was the epitome of a ten-pinter. When we all went out he'd hide her in a corner in case anyone saw them together. But after a few beers she seemed to soften round the edges and after five or six actually became quite attractive).

Meaning of benny

benny means: Noun. 1. A tantrum, a fit of anger. See 'throw a benny'. 2. A person from the Falkland Islands. A nickname given to islanders by the British army during the Falklands War, and supposedly as they looked like a character called Benny from a British TV soap called Crossroads. [1982]

Meaning of gonk

gonk means: Idiotic person, or a person of low intelligence. Used mostly by children. Imagine the hilarities which ensued when a child recently called out "YOU'RE MEANT TO BE OVER THERE, YOU STUPID FUCKING TWAT-HEAD GONK!" during a game of "Friendly Football" (ed: subtle like... ). Derived from those little hairy toys called Gonks.

Meaning of Grog

Grog means: One part rum mixed with two parts water. Named after the British Admiral named Vernon who, in 1740, ordered the men's ration of rum to be watered down. He was called "Old Grogram" because he often wore a grogram coat, and the watered rum came to be called "grog".

Meaning of dogsbody

dogsbody means: n lowly servant; gopher. Your dogsbody would be the person who polished your shoes, emptied your bins and cleaned your loo. That is, if you were lucky enough to have someone like that. The term may originate from a dried pea-based foodstuff used in the Royal Navy, which sailors called “dog’s body”. Perhaps the first person to be called a dogsbody closely resembled a dried pea.

Meaning of cheesinmorgancredit

cheesinmorgancredit means: When the drug LSD is taken, it tends to make the consumer laugh at anything. This was called "Cheesing" Because you are laughing at "cheesy" things. Morgan is the woman who made it up, and to give her credit, it was added at the end, and thus to this day it has been called cheesinmorgancredit. It is a quite amusing word., Not sure if this constitutes being a noun, subject, mineral, fish, or actual northern burrowing animal. (ed: this makes no sense at all but I added it verbatim just for the hell of it)

Meaning of sally

sally means: Whenever we go to the bar, and someone wants to stop drinking for some absurd reason, like they have to be at work early the next morning, or can't handle more than 3 beers and act like a normal person, they are called a "Sally" or more commonly, a "Sally-ass". It pretty much means that you're lame and cant handle your drinks., I have no clue where this came from, but we started saying it around 1999. Get branded as a "Sally" and you don't get invited out too much. "Sallys" actually get rather offended about being called on it, and always feel the need to prove in some way that you are wrong for the next half hour.

Meaning of Growlers

Growlers means: Buckets, cans, or pitchers carried by apprentices or children to the saloon to be filled with beer and returned to the workplace during the day. They were called "growlers" because of the grating noise when slid across the bar. Fetching the beer from the saloon in a growler was called rushing the growler, working the growler, or chasing the can.

Meaning of grannies/grampas

grannies/grampas means: The bit of fizzy-drink left in the lip of a soft drink can after drinking. especially referred to when sharing drinks, where the second person to drink would ask the first person to "take their grannies with them". the first would then suck up the remainder around the rim. Seems they're called grannies or grampas because they're hard to get rid of and hang around like old people. sometimes also called stragglers.

Meaning of WALL STREET NOTCH

WALL STREET NOTCH means: Forward corner of reverse lever quadrant in engine cab (more commonly called company notch). Called Wall Street notch because engine pays dividends when heaviness of train requires engine to be worked that way

Meaning of So-called

So-called means: So named; called by such a name (but perhaps called thus with doubtful propriety).

Meaning of Impatiens

Impatiens means: A genus of plants, several species of which have very beautiful flowers; -- so called because the elastic capsules burst when touched, and scatter the seeds with considerable force. Called also touch-me-not, jewelweed, and snapweed. I. Balsamina (sometimes called lady's slipper) is the common garden balsam.

Meaning of Hemoglobin

Hemoglobin means: The normal coloring matter of the red blood corpuscles of vertebrate animals. It is composed of hematin and globulin, and is also called haematoglobulin. In arterial blood, it is always combined with oxygen, and is then called oxyhemoglobin. It crystallizes under different forms from different animals, and when crystallized, is called haematocrystallin. See Blood crystal, under Blood.

Meaning of Blackcoat

Blackcoat means: A clergyman; -- familiarly so called, as a soldier is sometimes called a redcoat or a bluecoat.

Meaning of Gyp

Gyp means: A college servant; -- so called in Cambridge, England; at Oxford called a scout.

Meaning of Knapweed

Knapweed means: The black centaury (Centaurea nigra); -- so called from the knoblike heads of flowers. Called also bullweed.

Meaning of Honewort

Honewort means: An umbelliferous plant of the genus Sison (S. Amomum); -- so called because used to cure a swelling called a hone.

Meaning of Gade

Gade means: A pike, so called at Moray Firth; -- called also gead.

Meaning of Postman

Postman means: One of the two most experienced barristers in the Court of Exchequer, who have precedence in motions; -- so called from the place where he sits. The other of the two is called the tubman.

Meaning of Scout

Scout means: A college student's or undergraduate's servant; -- so called in Oxford, England; at Cambridge called a gyp; and at Dublin, a skip.

Meaning of Polychroite

Polychroite means: The coloring matter of saffron; -- formerly so called because of the change of color on treatment with certain acids; -- called also crocin, and safranin.

Meaning of Rapparee

Rapparee means: A wild Irish plunderer, esp. one of the 17th century; -- so called from his carrying a half-pike, called a rapary.

Meaning of Acalephae

Acalephae means: A group of Coelenterata, including the Medusae or jellyfishes, and hydroids; -- so called from the stinging power they possess. Sometimes called sea nettles.

Meaning of Denarius

Denarius means: A Roman silver coin of the value of about fourteen cents; the "penny" of the New Testament; -- so called from being worth originally ten of the pieces called as.

Meaning of Hendecane

Hendecane means: A hydrocarbon, C11H24, of the paraffin series; -- so called because it has eleven atoms of carbon in each molecule. Called also endecane, undecane.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Arch

Arch means: A chief.

Meaning of Bridgeboard

Bridgeboard means: A notched board to which the treads and risers of the steps of wooden stairs are fastened.

Meaning of Conscience

Conscience means: Knowledge of one's own thoughts or actions; consciousness.

Meaning of Farthingale

Farthingale means: A hoop skirt or hoop petticoat, or other light, elastic material, used to extend the petticoat.

Meaning of Giantry

Giantry means: The race of giants.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of DEERACKS

DEERACKS means: Deeracks is British slang for playing cards.

Meaning of JOHN WAYNE

JOHN WAYNE means: John Wayne is London Cockney rhyming slang for a train.

Meaning of airy-fairy

airy-fairy means: Adj. Lacking in strength, insubstantial. {Informal}

Meaning of spanner

spanner means: 1 n wrench. 2 adj A very mild friendly insult: Bob’ll be a bit late; the spanner left his phone in a taxi.

Meaning of Cow Juice

Cow Juice means: Milk

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