Slang meaning of WABASH

WABASH means: To hit cars going into adjacent tracks. (See cornered) Also refers to the officially frowned-upon practice of slowing up for a stop signal at a crossing with another railroad instead of stopping. The engineer would look up and down to make sure everything is safe, then start up again, having saved several minutes by not stopping entirely. Wabash may also mean a heavy fire in the locomotive firebox

What is the slang meaning/definition of WABASH ?

WABASH means: To hit cars going into adjacent tracks. (See cornered) Also refers to the officially frowned-upon practice of slowing up for a stop signal at a crossing with another railroad instead of stopping. The engineer would look up and down to make sure everything is safe, then start up again, having saved several minutes by not stopping entirely. Wabash may also mean a heavy fire in the locomotive firebox

Slang definition of WABASH

WABASH means: To hit cars going into adjacent tracks. (See cornered) Also refers to the officially frowned-upon practice of slowing up for a stop signal at a crossing with another railroad instead of stopping. The engineer would look up and down to make sure everything is safe, then start up again, having saved several minutes by not stopping entirely. Wabash may also mean a heavy fire in the locomotive firebox

More meanings / definitions of To hit cars going into adjacent tracks. (See cornered) Also refers to the officially frowned-upon practice of slowing up for a stop signal at a crossing with another railroad instead of stopping. The engineer would look up and down to make sure everything is safe, then start up again, having saved several minutes by not stopping entirely. Wabash may also mean a heavy fire in the locomotive firebox or words, sentences containing To hit cars going into adjacent tracks. (See cornered) Also refers to the officially frowned-upon practice of slowing up for a stop signal at a crossing with another railroad instead of stopping. The engineer would look up and down to make sure everything is safe, then start up again, having saved several minutes by not stopping entirely. Wabash may also mean a heavy fire in the locomotive firebox?

Mahovo (n.): A device for saving power in stopping and starting a railroad car, by means of a heavy fly wheel.

Plug (v. t.): To stop with a plug; to make tight by stopping a hole.

Slidometer (n.): An instrument for indicating and recording shocks to railway cars occasioned by sudden stopping.

Stopping (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Stop

Locomotive (n.): A locomotive engine; a self-propelling wheel carriage, especially one which bears a steam boiler and one or more steam engines which communicate motion to the wheels and thus propel the carriage, -- used to convey goods or passengers, or to draw wagons, railroad cars, etc. See Illustration in Appendix.

Stop (n.): The act of stopping, or the state of being stopped; hindrance of progress or of action; cessation; repression; interruption; check; obstruction.

Fusee (n.): A small packet of explosive material with wire appendages allowing it to be conveniently attached to a railroad track. It will explode with a loud report when run over by a train, and is used to provide a warning signal to the engineer.

Station (n.): A regular stopping place in a stage road or route; a place where railroad trains regularly come to a stand, for the convenience of passengers, taking in fuel, moving freight, etc.

Engineer (v. t.): To lay out or construct, as an engineer; to perform the work of an engineer on; as, to engineer a road.

Cab (n.): The covered part of a locomotive, in which the engineer has his station.

Footboard (n.): The platform for the engineer and fireman of a locomotive.

Start (v. t.): To cause to move or act; to set going, running, or flowing; as, to start a railway train; to start a mill; to start a stream of water; to start a rumor; to start a business.

Plugging (n.): The act of stopping with a plug.

Solstice (v. i.): A stopping or standing still of the sun.

Obstipation (n.): The act of stopping up, as a passage.

Intercipient (a.): Intercepting; stopping.

Stopping (n.): Material for filling a cavity.

Obturation (n.): The act of stopping up, or closing, an opening.

Interclusion (n.): Interception; a stopping / obstruction.

Hostler (n.): The person who takes charge of a locomotive when it is left by the engineer after a trip.

Halt (a.): Halting or stopping in walking; lame.

Stopping (n.): A partition or door to direct or prevent a current of air.

Cut-off (n.): Any device for stopping or changing a current, as of grain or water in a spout.

Tap (n.): A plug or spile for stopping a hole pierced in a cask, or the like; a faucet.

Suffocate (v. t.): To choke or kill by stopping respiration; to stifle; to smother.

Shackle (v. t.): To join by a link or chain, as railroad cars.

Train (v.): A connected line of cars or carriages on a railroad.

Stopping (n.): A pad or poultice of dung or other material applied to a horse's hoof to keep it moist.

Gate (n.): A door, valve, or other device, for stopping the passage of water through a dam, lock, pipe, etc.

Oppilation (n.): The act of filling or crowding together; a stopping by redundant matter; obstruction, particularly in the lower intestines.

Like to add another meaning or definition of To hit cars going into adjacent tracks. (See cornered) Also refers to the officially frowned-upon practice of slowing up for a stop signal at a crossing with another railroad instead of stopping. The engineer would look up and down to make sure everything is safe, then start up again, having saved several minutes by not stopping entirely. Wabash may also mean a heavy fire in the locomotive firebox?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to To hit cars going into adjacent tracks. (See cornered) Also refers to the officially frowned-upon practice of slowing up for a stop signal at a crossing with another railroad instead of stopping. The engineer would look up and down to make sure everything is safe, then start up again, having saved several minutes by not stopping entirely. Wabash may also mean a heavy fire in the locomotive firebox

Meaning of WABASH

WABASH means: To hit cars going into adjacent tracks. (See cornered) Also refers to the officially frowned-upon practice of slowing up for a stop signal at a crossing with another railroad instead of stopping. The engineer would look up and down to make sure everything is safe, then start up again, having saved several minutes by not stopping entirely. Wabash may also mean a heavy fire in the locomotive firebox

Meaning of SLUG

SLUG means: Heavy fire in locomotive firebox

Meaning of TAKING YOUR MINUTES

TAKING YOUR MINUTES means: Stopping for lunch

Meaning of 24/7

24/7 means: non-stop, never stopping, never ending (pronounced "twenty four seven")

Meaning of Pelican crossing

Pelican crossing means: n pedestrian crossing. An area of the road, marked with black and white stripes, where traffic lights stop cars so that pedestrians can cross. A contraction of “PEdestrian LIght CONtrolled crossing.” Yes, I know that would be “pelicon.” People were stupid back then.

Meaning of zebra crossing

zebra crossing means: n the black-and-white striped pathways drawn across roads where pedestrians have right of way and motorists have to stop if anyone is waiting by them. The phrase has been slightly usurped by the less exciting term “pedestrian crossing.” While this very concept of “it’s alright, on you go, the cars all have to stop” is dangerous enough, a great deal of them are positioned straight after roundabouts where motorists are least likely to be ready for them. I swear these things are part of some sort of population control policy. To make them marginally easier to see, some of them are marked with Belisha Beacons.

Meaning of GUN

GUN means: Torpedo, part of trainman's equipment; it is placed on the track as a signal to the engineer. Also the injector on the locomotive that forces water from tank to boiler. To gun means to control air-brake system from rear of train

Meaning of PIG

PIG means: Locomotive. Pig-mauler is locomotive engineer; pigpen locomotive roundhouse. (See hog)

Meaning of JERK A DRINK

JERK A DRINK means: Take water from track pan without stopping train. From this came the word jerkwater, which usually means a locality serving only to supply water to the engines of passing trains; a Place other than a regular stop, hence of minor importance as jerkwater town, jerkwater college, etc.

Meaning of brûler les étapes

brûler les étapes means: go without stopping; go faster than expected

Meaning of BOARD

BOARD means: Fixed signal regulating railroad traffic, usually referred to as slow board., order board., clear board (for clear tracks) or red board (stop). Do not confuse this with extra board or spare board, colloquially known as slow board or starvation list, usually containing names of qualified train or enginemen not in regular active service who are called to work in emergencies. These names are listed in order of seniority, the man hired most recently being the last one called to service

Meaning of RAP THE STACK

RAP THE STACK means: Give your locomotive a wide-open throttle, make more speed. Rapper is an engineer who works his engine too hard

Meaning of WASHOUT

WASHOUT means: Stop signal, waved violently by using both arms and swinging them in downward arc by day, or swinging lamp in wide low semicircle across tracks at night

Meaning of HAND-ON

HAND-ON means: Train order or company mail caught with the hoop or without stopping

Meaning of make tracks

make tracks means: Verb. To begin a journey. E.g."OK, it's 8.30 and we've got to get to London by midday, let's make tracks."

Meaning of STOP AND START

STOP AND START means: Stop and start is London Cockney rhyming slang for the heart.

Meaning of WET MULE IN THE FIREBOX

WET MULE IN THE FIREBOX means: Bad job of firing a locomotive

Meaning of BAIL IT IN

BAIL IT IN means: Feed the locomotive firebox

Meaning of lip service

lip service means: To tell people what they want to hear to get them off your back, for the moment. To not be truthful. Commonly used by teenagers as a means of stopping their parents nagging them. Also used by politicans.

Meaning of estar a salvo

estar a salvo means: be safe; be secure. (lit.: to be at saved)

Meaning of Mahovo

Mahovo means: A device for saving power in stopping and starting a railroad car, by means of a heavy fly wheel.

Meaning of Plug

Plug means: To stop with a plug; to make tight by stopping a hole.

Meaning of Slidometer

Slidometer means: An instrument for indicating and recording shocks to railway cars occasioned by sudden stopping.

Meaning of Stopping

Stopping means: of Stop

Meaning of Locomotive

Locomotive means: A locomotive engine; a self-propelling wheel carriage, especially one which bears a steam boiler and one or more steam engines which communicate motion to the wheels and thus propel the carriage, -- used to convey goods or passengers, or to draw wagons, railroad cars, etc. See Illustration in Appendix.

Meaning of Stop

Stop means: The act of stopping, or the state of being stopped; hindrance of progress or of action; cessation; repression; interruption; check; obstruction.

Meaning of Fusee

Fusee means: A small packet of explosive material with wire appendages allowing it to be conveniently attached to a railroad track. It will explode with a loud report when run over by a train, and is used to provide a warning signal to the engineer.

Meaning of Station

Station means: A regular stopping place in a stage road or route; a place where railroad trains regularly come to a stand, for the convenience of passengers, taking in fuel, moving freight, etc.

Meaning of Engineer

Engineer means: To lay out or construct, as an engineer; to perform the work of an engineer on; as, to engineer a road.

Meaning of Cab

Cab means: The covered part of a locomotive, in which the engineer has his station.

Meaning of Footboard

Footboard means: The platform for the engineer and fireman of a locomotive.

Meaning of Start

Start means: To cause to move or act; to set going, running, or flowing; as, to start a railway train; to start a mill; to start a stream of water; to start a rumor; to start a business.

Meaning of Plugging

Plugging means: The act of stopping with a plug.

Meaning of Solstice

Solstice means: A stopping or standing still of the sun.

Meaning of Obstipation

Obstipation means: The act of stopping up, as a passage.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Bloodless

Bloodless means: Destitute of blood, or apparently so; as, bloodless cheeks; lifeless; dead.

Meaning of Ditty-box

Ditty-box means: A small box to hold a sailor's thread, needless, comb, etc.

Meaning of Enlarging

Enlarging means: of Enlarge

Meaning of Envolup

Envolup means: To wrap up; to envelop.

Meaning of Calyxes

Calyxes means: of Nematocalyx

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of RAT−RUN

RAT−RUN means: Rat−run is Britisg slang for a side street used by fast commuter traffic.

Meaning of RIBBON

RIBBON means: Ribbon was th century slang for a bell−pull. Ribbon is old slang for gin or other spirits.

Meaning of moger

moger means: Added verbatim): 'moger' (pronounced, mo -[as in 'go']- ger) exceptionally and consistantly stupid person; naturally stupid; most likely 'slow' (i.e.mental) one step beyond mongo. This was used most commonly in relation to poor girl they knew called Moore and who was therefore 'Moger Moore'. It was weeks before I found out her real first name.

Meaning of Sinkers

Sinkers means: Doughnuts

Meaning of hot

hot means: Fast (music). The police stopped them because they thought the car was hot.

Tags: Slang Meaning of To hit cars going into adjacent tracks. (See cornered) Also refers to the officially frowned-upon practice of slowing up for a stop signal at a crossing with another railroad instead of stopping. The engineer would look up and down to make sure everything is safe, then start up again, having saved several minutes by not stopping entirely. Wabash may also mean a heavy fire in the locomotive firebox. The slang definition of To hit cars going into adjacent tracks. (See cornered) Also refers to the officially frowned-upon practice of slowing up for a stop signal at a crossing with another railroad instead of stopping. The engineer would look up and down to make sure everything is safe, then start up again, having saved several minutes by not stopping entirely. Wabash may also mean a heavy fire in the locomotive firebox. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of To hit cars going into adjacent tracks. (See cornered) Also refers to the officially frowned-upon practice of slowing up for a stop signal at a crossing with another railroad instead of stopping. The engineer would look up and down to make sure everything is safe, then start up again, having saved several minutes by not stopping entirely. Wabash may also mean a heavy fire in the locomotive firebox? Please, add a definition of To hit cars going into adjacent tracks. (See cornered) Also refers to the officially frowned-upon practice of slowing up for a stop signal at a crossing with another railroad instead of stopping. The engineer would look up and down to make sure everything is safe, then start up again, having saved several minutes by not stopping entirely. Wabash may also mean a heavy fire in the locomotive firebox if you did not find one from a search of To hit cars going into adjacent tracks. (See cornered) Also refers to the officially frowned-upon practice of slowing up for a stop signal at a crossing with another railroad instead of stopping. The engineer would look up and down to make sure everything is safe, then start up again, having saved several minutes by not stopping entirely. Wabash may also mean a heavy fire in the locomotive firebox.

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