Slang meaning of french/french loaf

french/french loaf means: four pounds, most likely from the second half of the 1900s, cockney rhyming slang for rofe (french loaf

What is the slang meaning/definition of french/french loaf ?

french/french loaf means: four pounds, most likely from the second half of the 1900s, cockney rhyming slang for rofe (french loaf

Slang definition of french/french loaf

french/french loaf means: four pounds, most likely from the second half of the 1900s, cockney rhyming slang for rofe (french loaf

More meanings / definitions of four pounds, most likely from the second half of the 1900s, cockney rhyming slang for rofe (french loaf or words, sentences containing four pounds, most likely from the second half of the 1900s, cockney rhyming slang for rofe (french loaf?

Quartern (n.): A loaf of bread weighing about four pounds; -- called also quartern loaf.

Portague (n.): A Portuguese gold coin formerly current, and variously estimated to be worth from three and one half to four and one half pounds sterling.

Slangy (a.): Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Cantarro (n.): A weight used in southern Europe and East for heavy articles. It varies in different localities; thus, at Rome it is nearly 75 pounds, in Sardinia nearly 94 pounds, in Cairo it is 95 pounds, in Syria about 503 pounds.

Half (adv.): In an equal part or degree; in some pa/ appro/mating a half; partially; imperfectly; as, half-colored, half done, half-hearted, half persuaded, half conscious.

Hundredweight (n.): A denomination of weight, containing 100, 112, or 120 pounds avoirdupois, according to differing laws or customs. By the legal standard of England it is 112 pounds. In most of the United States, both in practice and by law, it is 100 pounds avoirdupois, the corresponding ton of 2,000 pounds, sometimes called the short ton, being the legal ton.

Kissingcrust (n.): The portion of the upper crust of a loaf which has touched another loaf in baking.

Slang (v. t.): To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Slang-whanger (n.): One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Tester (n.): An old French silver coin, originally of the value of about eighteen pence, subsequently reduced to ninepence, and later to sixpence, sterling. Hence, in modern English slang, a sixpence; -- often contracted to tizzy. Called also teston.

Loaf (v. t.): To spend in idleness; -- with away; as, to loaf time away.

Half (a.): Consisting of a moiety, or half; as, a half bushel; a half hour; a half dollar; a half view.

Half (a.): Consisting of some indefinite portion resembling a half; approximately a half, whether more or less; partial; imperfect; as, a half dream; half knowledge.

Slang (n.): Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Quarter (n.): The fourth of a hundred-weight, being 25 or 28 pounds, according as the hundredweight is reckoned at 100 or 112 pounds.

Candy (n.): A weight, at Madras 500 pounds, at Bombay 560 pounds.

Gallicism (n.): A mode of speech peculiar to the French; a French idiom; also, in general, a French mode or custom.

Tret (n.): An allowance to purchasers, for waste or refuse matter, of four pounds on every 104 pounds of suttle weight, or weight after the tare deducted.

Pood (n.): A Russian weight, equal to forty Russian pounds or about thirty-six English pounds avoirdupois.

Batman (n.): A weight used in the East, varying according to the locality; in Turkey, the greater batman is about 157 pounds, the lesser only a fourth of this; at Aleppo and Smyrna, the batman is 17 pounds.

Rhyming (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Rhyme

Triplet (n.): Three verses rhyming together.

Cockneys (pl. ): of Cockney

Cokenay (n.): A cockney.

Horse power (): A unit of power, used in stating the power required to drive machinery, and in estimating the capabilities of animals or steam engines and other prime movers for doing work. It is the power required for the performance of work at the rate of 33,000 English units of work per minute; hence, it is the power that must be exerted in lifting 33,000 pounds at the rate of one foot per minute, or 550 pounds at the rate of one foot per second, or 55 pounds at the rate of ten feet per second, etc.

Clove (n.): A weight. A clove of cheese is about eight pounds, of wool, about seven pounds.

Cockney (a.): Of or relating to, or like, cockneys.

Frenchify (v. t.): To make French; to infect or imbue with the manners or tastes of the French; to Gallicize.

Frenchism (n.): A French mode or characteristic; an idiom peculiar to the French language.

Quatrain (n.): A stanza of four lines rhyming alternately.

Like to add another meaning or definition of four pounds, most likely from the second half of the 1900s, cockney rhyming slang for rofe (french loaf?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to four pounds, most likely from the second half of the 1900s, cockney rhyming slang for rofe (french loaf

Meaning of french/french loaf

french/french loaf means: four pounds, most likely from the second half of the 1900s, cockney rhyming slang for rofe (french loaf

Meaning of FRENCH LOAF

FRENCH LOAF means: French loaf is racing slang for four (rofe).

Meaning of bice/byce

bice/byce means: two shillings (2/-) or two pounds or twenty pounds - probably from the French bis, meaning twice, which suggests usage is older than the 1900s first recorded and referenced by dictionary sources. Bice could also occur in conjunction with other shilling slang, where the word bice assumes the meaning 'two', as in 'a bice of deaners', pronounced 'bicerdeaners', and with other money slang, for example bice of tenners, pronounced 'bicertenners', meaning twenty pounds.

Meaning of cock and hen

cock and hen means: ten pounds (thanks N Shipperley). The ten pound meaning of cock and hen is 20th century rhyming slang. Cock and hen - also cockerel and hen - has carried the rhyming slang meaning for the number ten for longer. Its transfer to ten pounds logically grew more popular through the inflationary 1900s as the ten pound amount and banknote became more common currency in people's wages and wallets, and therefore language. Cock and hen also gave raise to the variations cockeren, cockeren and hen, hen, and the natural rhyming slang short version, cock - all meaning ten pounds.

Meaning of LOAF

LOAF means: Loaf is slang for life.Loaf (shortened from loaf of bread) is British rhyming slang for head.Loaf is British slang for an elderly person.

Meaning of tosheroon/tusheroon/tosh/tush/tusseroon

tosheroon/tusheroon/tosh/tush/tusseroon means: half-a-crown (2/6) from the mid-1900s, and rarely also slang for a crown (5/-), most likely based in some way on madza caroon ('lingua franca' from mezzo crown), perhaps because of the rhyming, or some lost cockney rhyming rationale.

Meaning of LOAF OF BREAD

LOAF OF BREAD means: Loaf of bread is London Cockney rhyming slang for head. Loaf of bread is London Cockney rhyming slang for dead.

Meaning of fiver

fiver means: five pounds (£5), from the mid-1800s. More rarely from the early-mid 1900s fiver could also mean five thousand pounds, but arguably it remains today the most widely used slang term for five pounds.

Meaning of loaf

loaf means: Noun. Head. Rhyming slang on loaf of bread. See 'use one's loaf'.

Meaning of carpet

carpet means: three pounds (£3) or three hundred pounds (£300), or sometimes thirty pounds (£30). This has confusing and convoluted origins, from as early as the late 1800s: It seems originally to have been a slang term for a three month prison sentence, based on the following: that 'carpet bag' was cockney rhyming slang for a 'drag', which was generally used to describe a three month sentence; also that in the prison workshops it supposedly took ninety days to produce a certain regulation-size piece of carpet; and there is also a belief that prisoners used to be awarded the luxury of a piece of carpet for their cell after three year's incarceration. The term has since the early 1900s been used by bookmakers and horse-racing, where carpet refers to odds of three-to-one, and in car dealing, where it refers to an amount of £300.

Meaning of half, half a bar/half a sheet/half a nicker

half, half a bar/half a sheet/half a nicker means: ten shillings (10/-), from the 1900s, and to a lesser degree after decimalisation, fifty pence (50p), based on the earlier meanings of bar and sheet for a pound. Half is also used as a logical prefix for many slang words which mean a pound, to form a slang expresion for ten shillings and more recently fifty pence (50p), for example and most popularly, 'half a nicker', 'half a quid', etc. The use of the word 'half' alone to mean 50p seemingly never gaught on, unless anyone can confirm otherwise.

Meaning of Tuppeny

Tuppeny means:     (Tuppeny Loaf) Head (Cockney Rhyming Slang from Loaf of Bread)

Meaning of garden/garden gate

garden/garden gate means: eight pounds (£8), cockney rhyming slang for eight, naturally extended to eight pounds. In spoken use 'a garden' is eight pounds. Incidentally garden gate is also rhyming slang for magistrate, and the plural garden gates is rhyming slang for rates. The word garden features strongly in London, in famous place names such as Hatton Garden, the diamond quarter in the central City of London, and Covent Garden, the site of the old vegetable market in West London, and also the term appears in sexual euphemisms, such as 'sitting in the garden with the gate unlocked', which refers to a careless pregnancy.

Meaning of fin/finn/finny/finnif/finnip/finnup/finnio/finnif

fin/finn/finny/finnif/finnip/finnup/finnio/finnif means: five pounds (£5), from the early 1800s. There are other spelling variations based on the same theme, all derived from the German and Yiddish (European/Hebrew mixture) funf, meaning five, more precisely spelled fünf. A 'double-finnif' (or double-fin, etc) means ten pounds; 'half-a-fin' (half-a-finnip, etc) would have been two pounds ten shillings (equal to £2.50).

Meaning of ONE AND HALF

ONE AND HALF means: One and half is London Cockney rhyming slang for scarf.

Meaning of commodore

commodore means: fifteen pounds (£15). The origin is almost certainly London, and the clever and amusing derivation reflects the wit of Londoners: Cockney rhyming slang for five pounds is a 'lady', (from Lady Godiva

Meaning of POUNDS AND PENCE

POUNDS AND PENCE means: Pounds and pence is London Cockney rhyming slang for sense.

Meaning of CENTRE HALF

CENTRE HALF means: Centre half is British slang for a five playing card. Centre half is London Cockney rhyming slang for scarf.

Meaning of nicker

nicker means: a pound (£1). Not pluralised for a number of pounds, eg., 'It cost me twenty nicker..' From the early 1900s, London slang, precise origin unknown. Possibly connected to the use of nickel in the minting of coins, and to the American slang use of nickel to mean a $5 dollar note, which at the late 1800s was valued not far from a pound. In the US a nickel is more commonly a five cent coin. A nicker bit is a one pound coin, and London cockney rhyming slang uses the expression 'nicker bits' to describe a case of diarrhoea.

Meaning of HALF OUNCE

HALF OUNCE means: Half ounce is London Cockney rhyming slang for slang for a beating (bounce). Half ounce is London Cockney rhyming slang for cheat (bounce).

Meaning of Quartern

Quartern means: A loaf of bread weighing about four pounds; -- called also quartern loaf.

Meaning of Portague

Portague means: A Portuguese gold coin formerly current, and variously estimated to be worth from three and one half to four and one half pounds sterling.

Meaning of Slangy

Slangy means: Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Meaning of Cantarro

Cantarro means: A weight used in southern Europe and East for heavy articles. It varies in different localities; thus, at Rome it is nearly 75 pounds, in Sardinia nearly 94 pounds, in Cairo it is 95 pounds, in Syria about 503 pounds.

Meaning of Half

Half means: In an equal part or degree; in some pa/ appro/mating a half; partially; imperfectly; as, half-colored, half done, half-hearted, half persuaded, half conscious.

Meaning of Hundredweight

Hundredweight means: A denomination of weight, containing 100, 112, or 120 pounds avoirdupois, according to differing laws or customs. By the legal standard of England it is 112 pounds. In most of the United States, both in practice and by law, it is 100 pounds avoirdupois, the corresponding ton of 2,000 pounds, sometimes called the short ton, being the legal ton.

Meaning of Kissingcrust

Kissingcrust means: The portion of the upper crust of a loaf which has touched another loaf in baking.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Meaning of Slang-whanger

Slang-whanger means: One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Meaning of Tester

Tester means: An old French silver coin, originally of the value of about eighteen pence, subsequently reduced to ninepence, and later to sixpence, sterling. Hence, in modern English slang, a sixpence; -- often contracted to tizzy. Called also teston.

Meaning of Loaf

Loaf means: To spend in idleness; -- with away; as, to loaf time away.

Meaning of Half

Half means: Consisting of a moiety, or half; as, a half bushel; a half hour; a half dollar; a half view.

Meaning of Half

Half means: Consisting of some indefinite portion resembling a half; approximately a half, whether more or less; partial; imperfect; as, a half dream; half knowledge.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Meaning of Quarter

Quarter means: The fourth of a hundred-weight, being 25 or 28 pounds, according as the hundredweight is reckoned at 100 or 112 pounds.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Bibliopegic

Bibliopegic means: Relating to the binding of books.

Meaning of Loggat

Loggat means: A small log or piece of wood.

Meaning of Monsel's solution

Monsel's solution means: An aqueous solution of Monsel's salt, having valuable styptic properties.

Meaning of Organize

Organize means: To sing in parts; as, to organize an anthem.

Meaning of Raw

Raw means: Not worked in due form; in the natural state; untouched by art; unwrought.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of FLAPSHOT

FLAPSHOT means: Flapshot is slang for an explicit pornographic photograph of the vagina with the labia pulled aside.

Meaning of PALEFACE

PALEFACE means: Paleface is derogatory Black slang for a white person.

Meaning of ZAMBUCK

ZAMBUCK means: Zambuck was early and mid−th century Australian slang for a St John's Ambulance man.

Meaning of rug up

rug up means: dress warmly ‘It’s cold outside, make sure you rug up.’

Meaning of tough

tough means: Excellent, outstanding. That's a real tough house; I'd like to live there.

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