Slang meaning of stiver/stuiver/stuyver

stiver/stuiver/stuyver means: an old penny (1d). Stiver also earlier referred to any low value coin. Stiver was used in English slang from the mid 1700s through to the 1900s, and was derived from the Dutch Stiver coin issued by the East India Company in the Cape (of South Africa), which was the lowest East India Co monetary unit. There were twenty Stivers to the East India Co florin or gulden, which was then equal to just over an English old penny (1d). (source Cassells)

What is the slang meaning/definition of stiver/stuiver/stuyver ?

stiver/stuiver/stuyver means: an old penny (1d). Stiver also earlier referred to any low value coin. Stiver was used in English slang from the mid 1700s through to the 1900s, and was derived from the Dutch Stiver coin issued by the East India Company in the Cape (of South Africa), which was the lowest East India Co monetary unit. There were twenty Stivers to the East India Co florin or gulden, which was then equal to just over an English old penny (1d). (source Cassells)

Slang definition of stiver/stuiver/stuyver

stiver/stuiver/stuyver means: an old penny (1d). Stiver also earlier referred to any low value coin. Stiver was used in English slang from the mid 1700s through to the 1900s, and was derived from the Dutch Stiver coin issued by the East India Company in the Cape (of South Africa), which was the lowest East India Co monetary unit. There were twenty Stivers to the East India Co florin or gulden, which was then equal to just over an English old penny (1d). (source Cassells)

More meanings / definitions of an old penny (1d). Stiver also earlier referred to any low value coin. Stiver was used in English slang from the mid 1700s through to the 1900s, and was derived from the Dutch Stiver coin issued by the East India Company in the Cape (of South Africa), which was the lowest East India Co monetary unit. There were twenty Stivers to the East India Co florin or gulden, which was then equal to just over an English old penny (1d). (source Cassells) or words, sentences containing an old penny (1d). Stiver also earlier referred to any low value coin. Stiver was used in English slang from the mid 1700s through to the 1900s, and was derived from the Dutch Stiver coin issued by the East India Company in the Cape (of South Africa), which was the lowest East India Co monetary unit. There were twenty Stivers to the East India Co florin or gulden, which was then equal to just over an English old penny (1d). (source Cassells)?

Stiver (n.): A Dutch coin, and money of account, of the value of two cents, or about one penny sterling; hence, figuratively, anything of little worth.

Penny (n.): Any small sum or coin; a groat; a stiver.

Portcullis (n.): An English coin of the reign of Elizabeth, struck for the use of the East India Company; -- so called from its bearing the figure of a portcullis on the reverse.

East (n.): The eastern parts of the earth; the regions or countries which lie east of Europe; the orient. In this indefinite sense, the word is applied to Asia Minor, Syria, Chaldea, Persia, India, China, etc.; as, the riches of the East; the diamonds and pearls of the East; the kings of the East.

Penny (n.): An English coin, formerly of copper, now of bronze, the twelfth part of an English shilling in account value, and equal to four farthings, or about two cents; -- usually indicated by the abbreviation d. (the initial of denarius).

Company (n.): An association of persons for the purpose of carrying on some enterprise or business; a corporation; a firm; as, the East India Company; an insurance company; a joint-stock company.

Zebu (n.): A bovine mammal (Ros Indicus) extensively domesticated in India, China, the East Indies, and East Africa. It usually has short horns, large pendulous ears, slender legs, a large dewlap, and a large, prominent hump over the shoulders; but these characters vary in different domestic breeds, which range in size from that of the common ox to that of a large mastiff.

Writer (n.): A clerk of a certain rank in the service of the late East India Company, who, after serving a certain number of years, became a factor.

Guilder (n.): A Dutch silver coin worth about forty cents; -- called also florin and gulden.

Residency (n.): A political agency at a native court in British India, held by an officer styled the Resident; also, a Dutch commercial colony or province in the East Indies.

Bodle (n.): A small Scotch coin worth about one sixth of an English penny.

East (a.): Toward the rising sun; or toward the point where the sun rises when in the equinoctial; as, the east gate; the east border; the east side; the east wind is a wind that blows from the east.

Beteela (n.): An East India muslin, formerly used for cravats, veils, etc.

East (v. i.): To move toward the east; to veer from the north or south toward the east; to orientate.

Carack (n.): A kind of large ship formerly used by the Spaniards and Portuguese in the East India trade; a galleon.

Trubu (n.): An East India herring (Clupea toli) which is extensively caught for the sake of its roe and for its flesh.

Nawab (n.): A deputy ruler or viceroy in India; also, a title given by courtesy to other persons of high rank in the East.

Indo-English (a.): Of or relating to the English who are born or reside in India; Anglo-Indian.

English (n.): The language of England or of the English nation, and of their descendants in America, India, and other countries.

India (n.): A country in Southern Asia; the two peninsulas of Hither and Farther India; in a restricted sense, Hither India, or Hindostan.

Koel (n.): Any one of several species of cuckoos of the genus Eudynamys, found in India, the East Indies, and Australia. They deposit their eggs in the nests of other birds.

Indian (a.): Of or pertaining to India proper; also to the East Indies, or, sometimes, to the West Indies.

Indo- (): A prefix signifying Indian (i. e., East Indian); of or pertaining of India.

Territory (n.): The extent of land belonging to, or under the dominion of, a prince, state, or other form of government; often, a tract of land lying at a distance from the parent country or from the seat of government; as, the territory of a State; the territories of the East India Company.

Muntjac (n.): Any one of several species of small Asiatic deer of the genus Cervulus, esp. C. muntjac, which occurs both in India and on the East Indian Islands.

Sola (n.): A leguminous plant (Aeschynomene aspera) growing in moist places in Southern India and the East Indies. Its pithlike stem is used for making hats, swimming-jackets, etc.

East (n.): Formerly, the part of the United States east of the Alleghany Mountains, esp. the Eastern, or New England, States; now, commonly, the whole region east of the Mississippi River, esp. that which is north of Maryland and the Ohio River; -- usually with the definite article; as, the commerce of the East is not independent of the agriculture of the West.

Orientate (v. i.): To move or turn toward the east; to veer from the north or south toward the east.

Water cock (): A large gallinule (Gallicrex cristatus) native of Australia, India, and the East Indies. In the breeding season the male is black and has a fleshy red caruncle, or horn, on the top of its head. Called also kora.

Carolus (n.): An English gold coin of the value of twenty or twenty-three shillings. It was first struck in the reign of Charles I.

Like to add another meaning or definition of an old penny (1d). Stiver also earlier referred to any low value coin. Stiver was used in English slang from the mid 1700s through to the 1900s, and was derived from the Dutch Stiver coin issued by the East India Company in the Cape (of South Africa), which was the lowest East India Co monetary unit. There were twenty Stivers to the East India Co florin or gulden, which was then equal to just over an English old penny (1d). (source Cassells)?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to an old penny (1d). Stiver also earlier referred to any low value coin. Stiver was used in English slang from the mid 1700s through to the 1900s, and was derived from the Dutch Stiver coin issued by the East India Company in the Cape (of South Africa), which was the lowest East India Co monetary unit. There were twenty Stivers to the East India Co florin or gulden, which was then equal to just over an English old penny (1d). (source Cassells)

Meaning of stiver/stuiver/stuyver

stiver/stuiver/stuyver means: an old penny (1d). Stiver also earlier referred to any low value coin. Stiver was used in English slang from the mid 1700s through to the 1900s, and was derived from the Dutch Stiver coin issued by the East India Company in the Cape (of South Africa), which was the lowest East India Co monetary unit. There were twenty Stivers to the East India Co florin or gulden, which was then equal to just over an English old penny (1d). (source Cassells)

Meaning of STIVER

STIVER means: In early th century English slang, a stiver was any coin of little value.

Meaning of Indianman

Indianman means: Indiaman: (1) Any of the large sailing ships engaged in the British trade with India from roughly 1600 to 1880. (2) : A ship from one the East India Trading Company. England, France, Holland, and Portugal; all of the countries had had East Indianmans. The ship were well armed and deadly, similar in defense to the Spanish Galleons. In every case they belonged to a government sanctioned corporation.

Meaning of Indiaman

Indiaman means: (1) Any of the large sailing ships engaged in the British trade with India from roughly 1600 to 1880. (2) Indianman: A ship from one the East India Trading Company. England, France, Holland, and Portugal; all of the countries had had East Indianmans. The ship were well armed and deadly, similar in defense to the Spanish Galleons. In every case they belonged to a government sanctioned corporation.

Meaning of EAST INDIA DOCKS

EAST INDIA DOCKS means: East India Docks was London Cockney rhyming slang for venereal disease (pox). East India Docks was London Cockney rhyming slang for socks.

Meaning of East Indianman

East Indianman means: A ship from one the East India Trading Company. England, France, Holland, and Portugal; all of the countries had East Indianmans. The ship were well armed and deadly, similar in defense to the Spanish Galleons. In every case they belonged to a government sanctioned corporation.

Meaning of groat

groat means: an old silver four-penny coin from around 1300 and in use in similar form until c.1662, although Brewer states in his late 1800s revised edition of his 1870 dictionary of slang that 'the modern groat was introduced in 1835, and withdrawn in 1887', which is somewhat confusing. Presumably there were different versions and issues of the groat coin, which seems to have been present in the coinage from the 14th to the 19th centuries. Very occasionally older people, students of English or History, etc., refer to loose change of a small amount of coin money as groats. Sadly the word is almost obsolete now, although the groat coin is kept alive in Maundy Money. The word derives from Middle English and Middle Dutch 'groot' meaning 'great' since this coin was a big one, compared to a penny. The similar German and Austrian coin was the 'Groschen', equivalent to 10 'Pfennigs'. The word can actually be traced back to Roman times, when a 'Denarius Grossus' was a 'thick penny' (equivalent).

Meaning of Indianman

Indianman means: A ship from one the East India Trading Company. England, France, Holland, and Portugal; all of the countries had had East Indianmans. The ship were well armed and deadly, similar in defense to the Spanish Galleons. In every case they belonged to a government sanctioned corporation.

Meaning of Delhi belly

Delhi belly means: Noun. A severe stomach upset. A common occurrence for Western travellers visiting countries of the East, such as India, hence the expression.

Meaning of boodle

boodle means: money. There are many different interpretations of boodle meaning money, in the UK and the US. Boodle normally referred to ill-gotten gains, such as counterfeit notes or the proceeds of a robbery, and also to a roll of banknotes, although in recent times the usage has extended to all sorts of money, usually in fairly large amounts. Much variation in meaning is found in the US. The origins of boodle meaning money are (according to Cassells) probably from the Dutch word 'boedel' for personal effects or property (a person's worth) and/or from the old Scottish 'bodle' coin, worth two Scottish pence and one-sixth of an English penny, which logically would have been pre-decimalisation currency.

Meaning of tickey/ticky/tickie/tiki/tikki/tikkie

tickey/ticky/tickie/tiki/tikki/tikkie means: ticky or tickey was an old pre-decimal British silver threepenny piece (3d, equating loosely to 1¼p). The tickey slang was in use in 1950s UK (in Birmingham for example, thanks M Bramich), although the slang is more popular in South Africa, from which the British usage seems derived. In South Africa the various spellings refer to a SA threepenny piece, and now the equivalent SA post-decimalisation 2½ cents coin. South African tickey and variations - also meaning 'small' - are first recorded in the 19th century from uncertain roots (according to Partridge and Cassells) - take your pick: African distorted interpretation of 'ticket' or 'threepenny'; from Romany tikeno and tikno (meaning small); from Dutch stukje (meaning a little bit); from Hindustani taka (a stamped silver coin); and/or from early Portuguese 'pataca' and French 'patac' (meaning what?.. Partridge doesn't say).

Meaning of INDIA

INDIA means: India is British slang for marijuana, cannabis.

Meaning of BRICS

BRICS means: Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa

Meaning of EAST AND SOUTH

EAST AND SOUTH means: East and south is London Cockney rhyming slang for mouth.

Meaning of dollar

dollar means: slang for money, commonly used in singular form, eg., 'Got any dollar?..'. In earlier times a dollar was slang for an English Crown, five shillings (5/-). From the 1900s in England and so called because the coin was similar in appearance and size to the American dollar coin, and at one time similar in value too. Brewer's dictionary of 1870 says that the American dollar is '..in English money a little more than four shillings..'. That's about 20p. The word dollar is originally derived from German 'Thaler', and earlier from Low German 'dahler', meaning a valley (from which we also got the word 'dale'). The connection with coinage is that the Counts of Schlick in the late 1400s mined silver from 'Joachim's Thal' (Joachim's Valley), from which was minted the silver ounce coins called Joachim's Thalers, which became standard coinage in that region of what would now be Germany. All later generic versions of the coins were called 'Thalers'. An 'oxford' was cockney rhyming slang for five shillings (5/-) based on the dollar rhyming slang: 'oxford scholar'.

Meaning of bob

bob means: shilling (1/-), although in recent times now means a pound or a dollar in certain regions. Historically bob was slang for a British shilling (Twelve old pence, pre-decimalisation - and twenty shillings to a pound). No plural version; it was 'thirty bob' not 'thirty bobs'. Prior to 1971 bob was one of the most commonly used English slang words. Now sadly gone in the UK for this particular meaning, although lots of other meanings remain (for example the verb or noun meaning of pooh, a haircut, and the verb meaning of cheat). Usage of bob for shilling dates back to the late 1700s. Origin is not known for sure. Possibilities include a connection with the church or bell-ringing since 'bob' meant a set of changes rung on the bells. This would be consistent with one of the possible origins and associations of the root of the word Shilling, (from Proto-Germanic 'skell' meaning to sound or ring). There is possibly an association with plumb-bob, being another symbolic piece of metal, made of lead and used to mark a vertical position in certain trades, notably masons. Brewer's 1870 Dictionary of Phrase and Fable states that 'bob' could be derived from 'Bawbee', which was 16-19th century slang for a half-penny, in turn derived from: French 'bas billon', meaning debased copper money (coins were commonly cut to make change). Brewer also references the Laird of Sillabawby, a 16th century mintmaster, as a possible origin. Also perhaps a connection with a plumb-bob, made of lead and used to mark a vertical position in certain trades, notably masons. 'Bob a nob', in the early 1800s meant 'a shilling a head', when estimating costs of meals, etc. In the 18th century 'bobstick' was a shillings-worth of gin. In parts of the US 'bob' was used for the US dollar coin. I am also informed (thanks K Inglott, March 2007) that bob is now slang for a pound in his part of the world (Bath, South-West England), and has also been used as money slang, presumably for Australian dollars, on the Home and Away TV soap series. A popular slang word like bob arguably develops a life of its own. Additionally (ack Martin Symington, Jun 2007) the word 'bob' is still commonly used among the white community of Tanzania in East Africa for the Tanzanian Shilling.

Meaning of cacker

cacker means: Noun. 1. Gypsy, traveller. Derog. [South-east use] 2. General derogatory term for any number of people with various social or behavioural problems, such as petty criminals, troublemakers, 'chavs'. [South-east use]

Meaning of flag

flag means: five pound note (£5), UK, notably in Manchester (ack Michael Hicks); also a USA one dollar bill; also used as a slang term for a money note in Australia although Cassells is vague about the value (if you know please contact us). The word flag has been used since the 1500s as a slang expression for various types of money, and more recently for certain notes. Originally (16th-19thC) the slang word flag was used for an English fourpenny groat coin, derived possibly from Middle Low German word 'Vleger' meaning a coin worth 'more than a Bremer groat' (Cassells). Derivation in the USA would likely also have been influenced by the slang expression 'Jewish Flag' or 'Jews Flag' for a $1 bill, from early 20th century, being an envious derogatory reference to perceived and stereotypical Jewish success in business and finance.

Meaning of florin/flo

florin/flo means: a two shilling or 'two bob' coin (florin is actually not slang - it's from Latin meaning flower, and a 14th century Florentine coin called the Floren). Equivalent to 10p - a tenth of a pound. A 'flo' is the slang shortening, meaning two shillings.

Meaning of lady/Lady Godiva

lady/Lady Godiva means: fiver (five pounds, £5) cockney rhyming slang, and like many others in this listing is popular in London and the South East of England, especially East London. (Thanks Simon Ladd, June 2007)

Meaning of Stiver

Stiver means: A Dutch coin, and money of account, of the value of two cents, or about one penny sterling; hence, figuratively, anything of little worth.

Meaning of Penny

Penny means: Any small sum or coin; a groat; a stiver.

Meaning of Portcullis

Portcullis means: An English coin of the reign of Elizabeth, struck for the use of the East India Company; -- so called from its bearing the figure of a portcullis on the reverse.

Meaning of East

East means: The eastern parts of the earth; the regions or countries which lie east of Europe; the orient. In this indefinite sense, the word is applied to Asia Minor, Syria, Chaldea, Persia, India, China, etc.; as, the riches of the East; the diamonds and pearls of the East; the kings of the East.

Meaning of Penny

Penny means: An English coin, formerly of copper, now of bronze, the twelfth part of an English shilling in account value, and equal to four farthings, or about two cents; -- usually indicated by the abbreviation d. (the initial of denarius).

Meaning of Company

Company means: An association of persons for the purpose of carrying on some enterprise or business; a corporation; a firm; as, the East India Company; an insurance company; a joint-stock company.

Meaning of Zebu

Zebu means: A bovine mammal (Ros Indicus) extensively domesticated in India, China, the East Indies, and East Africa. It usually has short horns, large pendulous ears, slender legs, a large dewlap, and a large, prominent hump over the shoulders; but these characters vary in different domestic breeds, which range in size from that of the common ox to that of a large mastiff.

Meaning of Writer

Writer means: A clerk of a certain rank in the service of the late East India Company, who, after serving a certain number of years, became a factor.

Meaning of Guilder

Guilder means: A Dutch silver coin worth about forty cents; -- called also florin and gulden.

Meaning of Residency

Residency means: A political agency at a native court in British India, held by an officer styled the Resident; also, a Dutch commercial colony or province in the East Indies.

Meaning of Bodle

Bodle means: A small Scotch coin worth about one sixth of an English penny.

Meaning of East

East means: Toward the rising sun; or toward the point where the sun rises when in the equinoctial; as, the east gate; the east border; the east side; the east wind is a wind that blows from the east.

Meaning of Beteela

Beteela means: An East India muslin, formerly used for cravats, veils, etc.

Meaning of East

East means: To move toward the east; to veer from the north or south toward the east; to orientate.

Meaning of Carack

Carack means: A kind of large ship formerly used by the Spaniards and Portuguese in the East India trade; a galleon.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Ajar

Ajar means: Slightly turned or opened; as, the door was standing ajar.

Meaning of Carcass

Carcass means: The abandoned and decaying remains of some bulky and once comely thing, as a ship; the skeleton, or the uncovered or unfinished frame, of a thing.

Meaning of Caucus

Caucus means: To hold, or meet in, a caucus or caucuses.

Meaning of Disaccordant

Disaccordant means: Not accordant.

Meaning of Fibrous

Fibrous means: Containing, or consisting of, fibers; as, the fibrous coat of the cocoanut; the fibrous roots of grasses.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of airy fairy

airy fairy means: Insubstantial, in the same vein as 'arty farty' where the 'thing' is supposed to be all 'piss and wind' with nothing real underneath.

Meaning of DJAMBA

DJAMBA means: marijuana

Meaning of deck

deck means: To knock down. That car is really decent!

Meaning of cuppa

cuppa means: a hot drink, cup of tea, cup of coffee

Tags: Slang Meaning of an old penny (1d). Stiver also earlier referred to any low value coin. Stiver was used in English slang from the mid 1700s through to the 1900s, and was derived from the Dutch Stiver coin issued by the East India Company in the Cape (of South Africa), which was the lowest East India Co monetary unit. There were twenty Stivers to the East India Co florin or gulden, which was then equal to just over an English old penny (1d). (source Cassells). The slang definition of an old penny (1d). Stiver also earlier referred to any low value coin. Stiver was used in English slang from the mid 1700s through to the 1900s, and was derived from the Dutch Stiver coin issued by the East India Company in the Cape (of South Africa), which was the lowest East India Co monetary unit. There were twenty Stivers to the East India Co florin or gulden, which was then equal to just over an English old penny (1d). (source Cassells). Did you find the slang meaning/definition of an old penny (1d). Stiver also earlier referred to any low value coin. Stiver was used in English slang from the mid 1700s through to the 1900s, and was derived from the Dutch Stiver coin issued by the East India Company in the Cape (of South Africa), which was the lowest East India Co monetary unit. There were twenty Stivers to the East India Co florin or gulden, which was then equal to just over an English old penny (1d). (source Cassells)? Please, add a definition of an old penny (1d). Stiver also earlier referred to any low value coin. Stiver was used in English slang from the mid 1700s through to the 1900s, and was derived from the Dutch Stiver coin issued by the East India Company in the Cape (of South Africa), which was the lowest East India Co monetary unit. There were twenty Stivers to the East India Co florin or gulden, which was then equal to just over an English old penny (1d). (source Cassells) if you did not find one from a search of an old penny (1d). Stiver also earlier referred to any low value coin. Stiver was used in English slang from the mid 1700s through to the 1900s, and was derived from the Dutch Stiver coin issued by the East India Company in the Cape (of South Africa), which was the lowest East India Co monetary unit. There were twenty Stivers to the East India Co florin or gulden, which was then equal to just over an English old penny (1d). (source Cassells).

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