Slang meaning of ten bob bit

ten bob bit means: fifty pence piece (50p). A rare example of money slang from more recent times, even though it draws from the pre-decimal slang, since the term refers to ten shillings (equivalent to 50p) and alludes to the angular shape of the old theepenny bit.

What is the slang meaning/definition of ten bob bit ?

ten bob bit means: fifty pence piece (50p). A rare example of money slang from more recent times, even though it draws from the pre-decimal slang, since the term refers to ten shillings (equivalent to 50p) and alludes to the angular shape of the old theepenny bit.

Slang definition of ten bob bit

ten bob bit means: fifty pence piece (50p). A rare example of money slang from more recent times, even though it draws from the pre-decimal slang, since the term refers to ten shillings (equivalent to 50p) and alludes to the angular shape of the old theepenny bit.

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More meanings / definitions of fifty pence piece (50p). A rare example of money slang from more recent times, even though it draws from the pre-decimal slang, since the term refers to ten shillings (equivalent to 50p) and alludes to the angular shape of the old theepenny bit. or words, sentences containing fifty pence piece (50p). A rare example of money slang from more recent times, even though it draws from the pre-decimal slang, since the term refers to ten shillings (equivalent to 50p) and alludes to the angular shape of the old theepenny bit.?

Slangy (a.): Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Slang (v. t.): To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Slang-whanger (n.): One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Slang (n.): Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Slang (n.): Any long, narrow piece of land; a promontory.

Pigskin (n.): The skin of a pig, -- used chiefly for making saddles; hence, a colloquial or slang term for a saddle.

Tester (n.): An old French silver coin, originally of the value of about eighteen pence, subsequently reduced to ninepence, and later to sixpence, sterling. Hence, in modern English slang, a sixpence; -- often contracted to tizzy. Called also teston.

Decimal (a.): Of or pertaining to decimals; numbered or proceeding by tens; having a tenfold increase or decrease, each unit being ten times the unit next smaller; as, decimal notation; a decimal coinage.

Pound (n.): A British denomination of money of account, equivalent to twenty shillings sterling, and equal in value to about $4.86. There is no coin known by this name, but the gold sovereign is of the same value.

Separatrix (n.): The decimal point; the dot placed at the left of a decimal fraction, to separate it from the whole number which it follows. The term is sometimes also applied to other marks of separation.

Slanged (imp. & p. p.): of Slang

Slanging (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Slang

Slang (): of Sling

Shilling (n.): A silver coin, and money of account, of Great Britain and its dependencies, equal to twelve pence, or the twentieth part of a pound, equivalent to about twenty-four cents of the United States currency.

Slang (): imp. of Sling. Slung.

Slang (n.): A fetter worn on the leg by a convict.

Flash (n.): Slang or cant of thieves and prostitutes.

Jargonist (n.): One addicted to jargon; one who uses cant or slang.

Peg (n.): A step; a degree; esp. in the slang phrase "To take one down peg."

Little-ease (n.): An old slang name for the pillory, stocks, etc., of a prison.

Capper (n.): A by-bidder; a decoy for gamblers [Slang, U. S.].

Scudo (n.): A gold coin of Rome, worth 64 shillings 11 pence sterling, or about $ 15.70.

Blank (n.): A kind of base silver money, first coined in England by Henry V., and worth about 8 pence; also, a French coin of the seventeenth century, worth about 4 pence.

Marc (n.): A coin formerly current in England and Scotland, equal to thirteen shillings and four pence.

Cant (n.): Vulgar jargon; slang; the secret language spoker by gipsies, thieves, tramps, or beggars.

Argot (n.): A secret language or conventional slang peculiar to thieves, tramps, and vagabonds; flash.

Reduce (n.): To change, as numbers, from one denomination into another without altering their value, or from one denomination into others of the same value; as, to reduce pounds, shillings, and pence to pence, or to reduce pence to pounds; to reduce days and hours to minutes, or minutes to days and hours.

Allude (v. i.): To refer to something indirectly or by suggestion; to have reference to a subject not specifically and plainly mentioned; -- followed by to; as, the story alludes to a recent transaction.

Cave (v. i.): To fall in or down; as, the sand bank caved. Hence (Slang), to retreat from a position; to give way; to yield in a disputed matter.

Manilla (n.): A piece of copper of the shape of a horseshoe, used as money by certain tribes of the west coast of Africa.

Like to add another meaning or definition of fifty pence piece (50p). A rare example of money slang from more recent times, even though it draws from the pre-decimal slang, since the term refers to ten shillings (equivalent to 50p) and alludes to the angular shape of the old theepenny bit.?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to fifty pence piece (50p). A rare example of money slang from more recent times, even though it draws from the pre-decimal slang, since the term refers to ten shillings (equivalent to 50p) and alludes to the angular shape of the old theepenny bit.

Meaning of ten bob bit

ten bob bit means: fifty pence piece (50p). A rare example of money slang from more recent times, even though it draws from the pre-decimal slang, since the term refers to ten shillings (equivalent to 50p) and alludes to the angular shape of the old theepenny bit.

Meaning of half a crown

half a crown means: two shillings and sixpence (2/6), and more specifically the 2/6 coin. Not actually slang, more an informal and extremely common pre-decimalisation term used as readily as 'two-and-six' in referring to that amount. Equivalent to 12½p in decimal money.

Meaning of half, half a bar/half a sheet/half a nicker

half, half a bar/half a sheet/half a nicker means: ten shillings (10/-), from the 1900s, and to a lesser degree after decimalisation, fifty pence (50p), based on the earlier meanings of bar and sheet for a pound. Half is also used as a logical prefix for many slang words which mean a pound, to form a slang expresion for ten shillings and more recently fifty pence (50p), for example and most popularly, 'half a nicker', 'half a quid', etc. The use of the word 'half' alone to mean 50p seemingly never gaught on, unless anyone can confirm otherwise.

Meaning of SHILLINGS AND PENCE

SHILLINGS AND PENCE means: Shillings and pence is old London Cockney rhyming slang for common sense.

Meaning of bob

bob means: n five-pence piece. Before the U.K.’s currency system was decimalised in 1971 and became simply “pounds and pence,” the Brits had “pounds, shillings and pence.” Like all crappy Imperial measures there wasn’t ten or a hundred of anything in anything and good riddance to the lot of it. In order to work out how to pay for anything you had to be able to divide by sixteen and nine tenths, subtracting room temperature. A “bob” was a shilling, and these days it’s still vaguely recognised as meaning five pence. Only vaguely, though.

Meaning of guinea

guinea means: guinea is not a slang term, it's a proper and historical word for an amount of money equating to twenty-one shillings, or in modern sterling one pound five pence.

Meaning of HALF

HALF means: Half is British slang for half of a pound sterling, ten shillings, fifty pence.

Meaning of boodle

boodle means: money. There are many different interpretations of boodle meaning money, in the UK and the US. Boodle normally referred to ill-gotten gains, such as counterfeit notes or the proceeds of a robbery, and also to a roll of banknotes, although in recent times the usage has extended to all sorts of money, usually in fairly large amounts. Much variation in meaning is found in the US. The origins of boodle meaning money are (according to Cassells) probably from the Dutch word 'boedel' for personal effects or property (a person's worth) and/or from the old Scottish 'bodle' coin, worth two Scottish pence and one-sixth of an English penny, which logically would have been pre-decimalisation currency.

Meaning of three ha'pence/three haypence

three ha'pence/three haypence means: 1½d (one and a half old pennies) - this lovely expression (thanks Dean) did not survive decimalisation, despite there being new decimal half-pence coins. In fact the term was obsolete before 1971 decimalisation when the old ha'penny (½d) was removed from the currency in 1969.

Meaning of bob

bob means: shilling (1/-), although in recent times now means a pound or a dollar in certain regions. Historically bob was slang for a British shilling (Twelve old pence, pre-decimalisation - and twenty shillings to a pound). No plural version; it was 'thirty bob' not 'thirty bobs'. Prior to 1971 bob was one of the most commonly used English slang words. Now sadly gone in the UK for this particular meaning, although lots of other meanings remain (for example the verb or noun meaning of pooh, a haircut, and the verb meaning of cheat). Usage of bob for shilling dates back to the late 1700s. Origin is not known for sure. Possibilities include a connection with the church or bell-ringing since 'bob' meant a set of changes rung on the bells. This would be consistent with one of the possible origins and associations of the root of the word Shilling, (from Proto-Germanic 'skell' meaning to sound or ring). There is possibly an association with plumb-bob, being another symbolic piece of metal, made of lead and used to mark a vertical position in certain trades, notably masons. Brewer's 1870 Dictionary of Phrase and Fable states that 'bob' could be derived from 'Bawbee', which was 16-19th century slang for a half-penny, in turn derived from: French 'bas billon', meaning debased copper money (coins were commonly cut to make change). Brewer also references the Laird of Sillabawby, a 16th century mintmaster, as a possible origin. Also perhaps a connection with a plumb-bob, made of lead and used to mark a vertical position in certain trades, notably masons. 'Bob a nob', in the early 1800s meant 'a shilling a head', when estimating costs of meals, etc. In the 18th century 'bobstick' was a shillings-worth of gin. In parts of the US 'bob' was used for the US dollar coin. I am also informed (thanks K Inglott, March 2007) that bob is now slang for a pound in his part of the world (Bath, South-West England), and has also been used as money slang, presumably for Australian dollars, on the Home and Away TV soap series. A popular slang word like bob arguably develops a life of its own. Additionally (ack Martin Symington, Jun 2007) the word 'bob' is still commonly used among the white community of Tanzania in East Africa for the Tanzanian Shilling.

Meaning of HALF−A−BAR

HALF−A−BAR means: Half−a−bar was British slang for ten shillings. Half−a−bar is British slang for fifty pence.

Meaning of dinarly/dinarla/dinaly

dinarly/dinarla/dinaly means: a shilling (1/-), from the mid-1800s, also transferred later to the decimal equivalent 5p piece, from the same roots that produced the 'deaner' shilling slang and variations, i.e., Roman denarius and then through other European dinar coins and variations. As with deanar the pronunciation emphasis tends to be on the long second syllable 'aah' sound.

Meaning of dollar

dollar means: slang for money, commonly used in singular form, eg., 'Got any dollar?..'. In earlier times a dollar was slang for an English Crown, five shillings (5/-). From the 1900s in England and so called because the coin was similar in appearance and size to the American dollar coin, and at one time similar in value too. Brewer's dictionary of 1870 says that the American dollar is '..in English money a little more than four shillings..'. That's about 20p. The word dollar is originally derived from German 'Thaler', and earlier from Low German 'dahler', meaning a valley (from which we also got the word 'dale'). The connection with coinage is that the Counts of Schlick in the late 1400s mined silver from 'Joachim's Thal' (Joachim's Valley), from which was minted the silver ounce coins called Joachim's Thalers, which became standard coinage in that region of what would now be Germany. All later generic versions of the coins were called 'Thalers'. An 'oxford' was cockney rhyming slang for five shillings (5/-) based on the dollar rhyming slang: 'oxford scholar'.

Meaning of coppers

coppers means: pre-decimal farthings, ha'pennies and pennies, and to a lesser extent 1p and 2p coins since decimalisation, and also meaning a very small amount of money. Coppers was very popular slang pre-decimalisation (1971), and is still used in referring to modern pennies and two-penny coins, typically describing the copper (coloured) coins in one's pocket or change, or piggy bank. Pre-decimal farthings, ha'pennies and pennies were 97% copper (technically bronze), and would nowadays be worth significantly more than their old face value because copper has become so much more valuable. Decimal 1p and 2p coins were also 97% copper (technically bronze - 97% copper, 2.5% zinc, 0.5% tin ) until replaced by copper-plated steel in 1992, which amusingly made them magnetic. The term coppers is also slang for a very small amount of money, or a cost of something typically less than a pound, usually referring to a bargain or a sum not worth thinking about, somewhat like saying 'peanuts' or 'a row of beans'. For example: "What did you pay for that?" ...... "Coppers."

Meaning of carpet

carpet means: three pounds (£3) or three hundred pounds (£300), or sometimes thirty pounds (£30). This has confusing and convoluted origins, from as early as the late 1800s: It seems originally to have been a slang term for a three month prison sentence, based on the following: that 'carpet bag' was cockney rhyming slang for a 'drag', which was generally used to describe a three month sentence; also that in the prison workshops it supposedly took ninety days to produce a certain regulation-size piece of carpet; and there is also a belief that prisoners used to be awarded the luxury of a piece of carpet for their cell after three year's incarceration. The term has since the early 1900s been used by bookmakers and horse-racing, where carpet refers to odds of three-to-one, and in car dealing, where it refers to an amount of £300.

Meaning of RARE

RARE means: Rare is British slang for good, yes, a slang term of agreement.

Meaning of cuca

cuca means: Pronounced KOO-kuh. A South Beach scene term, usually but not exclusively used in Latino groups. A shortened form of Mexican-Spanish term for cockroach] refers in a semi-loving way to a gay friend. It alludes to the furtive nightime scurryings of club-hopping party boys.

Meaning of two bob bit

two bob bit means: Noun. An act of defecation. Rhyming slang on 'shit'. In pre-decimal currency, a 'bob' was slang for a shilling (5 pence), and a 'two bob bit' being a two shilling coin, usually called a Florin. See 'bob' (noun).

Meaning of spence

spence means: Money. From 'pence' - that's the old UK £.s.d type pence not this "new pence" rubbish!

Meaning of silver

silver means: silver coloured coins, typically a handful or piggy-bankful of different ones - i.e., a mixture of 5p, 10p, 20p and 50p. Commonly used in speech as 'some silver' or 'any silver', for example: "Have you got any silver for the car-park?" or What tip shall we leave?" ... "Some silver will do." In fact 'silver' coins are now made of cupro-nickel 75% copper, 25% nickel (the 20p being 84% and 16% for some reason). The slang term 'silver' in relation to monetary value has changed through time, since silver coins used to be far more valuable. In fact arguably the modern term 'silver' equates in value to 'coppers' of a couple of generations ago. Silver featured strongly in the earliest history of British money, so it's pleasing that the word still occurs in modern money slang. Interestingly also, pre-decimal coins (e.g., shillings, florins, sixpences) were minted in virtually solid silver up until 1920, when they were reduced to a still impressive 50% silver content. The modern 75% copper 25% nickel composition was introduced in 1947. Changes in coin composition necessarily have to stay ahead of economic attractions offered by the scrap metal trade. It is therefore only a matter of time before modern 'silver' copper-based coins have to be made of less valuable metals, upon which provided they remain silver coloured I expect only the scrap metal dealers will notice the difference.

Meaning of Slangy

Slangy means: Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Meaning of Slang-whanger

Slang-whanger means: One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: Any long, narrow piece of land; a promontory.

Meaning of Pigskin

Pigskin means: The skin of a pig, -- used chiefly for making saddles; hence, a colloquial or slang term for a saddle.

Meaning of Tester

Tester means: An old French silver coin, originally of the value of about eighteen pence, subsequently reduced to ninepence, and later to sixpence, sterling. Hence, in modern English slang, a sixpence; -- often contracted to tizzy. Called also teston.

Meaning of Decimal

Decimal means: Of or pertaining to decimals; numbered or proceeding by tens; having a tenfold increase or decrease, each unit being ten times the unit next smaller; as, decimal notation; a decimal coinage.

Meaning of Pound

Pound means: A British denomination of money of account, equivalent to twenty shillings sterling, and equal in value to about $4.86. There is no coin known by this name, but the gold sovereign is of the same value.

Meaning of Separatrix

Separatrix means: The decimal point; the dot placed at the left of a decimal fraction, to separate it from the whole number which it follows. The term is sometimes also applied to other marks of separation.

Meaning of Slanged

Slanged means: of Slang

Meaning of Slanging

Slanging means: of Slang

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: of Sling

Meaning of Shilling

Shilling means: A silver coin, and money of account, of Great Britain and its dependencies, equal to twelve pence, or the twentieth part of a pound, equivalent to about twenty-four cents of the United States currency.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: imp. of Sling. Slung.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Baston

Baston means: A staff or cudgel.

Meaning of Lodgment

Lodgment means: The act of lodging, or the state of being lodged.

Meaning of Melanagogue

Melanagogue means: A medicine supposed to expel black bile or choler.

Meaning of Regratiatory

Regratiatory means: A returning or giving of thanks.

Meaning of Unalloyed

Unalloyed means: Not alloyed; not reduced by foreign admixture; unmixed; unqualified; pure; as, unalloyed metals; unalloyed happiness.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of feck

feck means: Used as punctuation variant of 'fuck' to avoid opprobrium.

Meaning of rattle

rattle means: Early form of birth control. The idea being that the girl stands against a wall, the boy stands on a box of marbles. They begin to have sex. When the box starts to rattle the girl kicks the box away,

Meaning of perve

perve means: Pervert.

Meaning of JOY POP

JOY POP means: to inject a drugs

Tags: Slang Meaning of fifty pence piece (50p). A rare example of money slang from more recent times, even though it draws from the pre-decimal slang, since the term refers to ten shillings (equivalent to 50p) and alludes to the angular shape of the old theepenny bit.. The slang definition of fifty pence piece (50p). A rare example of money slang from more recent times, even though it draws from the pre-decimal slang, since the term refers to ten shillings (equivalent to 50p) and alludes to the angular shape of the old theepenny bit.. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of fifty pence piece (50p). A rare example of money slang from more recent times, even though it draws from the pre-decimal slang, since the term refers to ten shillings (equivalent to 50p) and alludes to the angular shape of the old theepenny bit.? Please, add a definition of fifty pence piece (50p). A rare example of money slang from more recent times, even though it draws from the pre-decimal slang, since the term refers to ten shillings (equivalent to 50p) and alludes to the angular shape of the old theepenny bit. if you did not find one from a search of fifty pence piece (50p). A rare example of money slang from more recent times, even though it draws from the pre-decimal slang, since the term refers to ten shillings (equivalent to 50p) and alludes to the angular shape of the old theepenny bit..

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