Slang meaning of JACKS ALIVE

JACKS ALIVE means: Jacks alive is London Cockney rhyming slang for five pounds sterling (five).

What is the slang meaning/definition of JACKS ALIVE ?

JACKS ALIVE means: Jacks alive is London Cockney rhyming slang for five pounds sterling (five).

Slang definition of JACKS ALIVE

JACKS ALIVE means: Jacks alive is London Cockney rhyming slang for five pounds sterling (five).

Trending & Popular Articles
If you are having difficulties to pay your mortgage, then you must take some measures to readily address the situation. Several reasons that may arise that...
Torn cartilage in a variety of athletes has brought down the career of so many and stopped that of others in the sports field. Knee braces are most often...
Forklift drivers possess an exceptional duty to carry products of all sizes and shapes. But, this can be hard for items such as weighty metal drums that need...
Search engine marketing (SEM) is a way of carrying out internet marketing which involves the promotion of websites by increasing their visibility in search...
Spa- It gives the definition to be relaxed and just be relaxed.       If you know a little about the spa, you must be aware of the health...

More meanings / definitions of Jacks alive is London Cockney rhyming slang for five pounds sterling (five). or words, sentences containing Jacks alive is London Cockney rhyming slang for five pounds sterling (five).?

Sterling (a.): Belonging to, or relating to, the standard British money of account, or the British coinage; as, a pound sterling; a shilling sterling; a penny sterling; -- now chiefly applied to the lawful money of England; but sterling cost, sterling value, are used.

Cockney (n.): A native or resident of the city of London; -- used contemptuously.

Pony (n.): Twenty-five pounds sterling.

Slangy (a.): Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Cantarro (n.): A weight used in southern Europe and East for heavy articles. It varies in different localities; thus, at Rome it is nearly 75 pounds, in Sardinia nearly 94 pounds, in Cairo it is 95 pounds, in Syria about 503 pounds.

Alive (a.): In a state of action; in force or operation; unextinguished; unexpired; existent; as, to keep the fire alive; to keep the affections alive.

Sterling (a.): Genuine; pure; of excellent quality; conforming to the highest standard; of full value; as, a work of sterling merit; a man of sterling good sense.

Tester (n.): An old French silver coin, originally of the value of about eighteen pence, subsequently reduced to ninepence, and later to sixpence, sterling. Hence, in modern English slang, a sixpence; -- often contracted to tizzy. Called also teston.

Portague (n.): A Portuguese gold coin formerly current, and variously estimated to be worth from three and one half to four and one half pounds sterling.

Hundredweight (n.): A denomination of weight, containing 100, 112, or 120 pounds avoirdupois, according to differing laws or customs. By the legal standard of England it is 112 pounds. In most of the United States, both in practice and by law, it is 100 pounds avoirdupois, the corresponding ton of 2,000 pounds, sometimes called the short ton, being the legal ton.

Slang (v. t.): To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Slang-whanger (n.): One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Alive (a.): Having life, in opposition to dead; living; being in a state in which the organs perform their functions; as, an animal or a plant which is alive.

Slang (n.): Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Quarter (n.): The fourth of a hundred-weight, being 25 or 28 pounds, according as the hundredweight is reckoned at 100 or 112 pounds.

Flat-cap (n.): A kind of low-crowned cap formerly worn by all classes in England, and continued in London after disuse elsewhere; -- hence, a citizen of London.

Candy (n.): A weight, at Madras 500 pounds, at Bombay 560 pounds.

Jacksmith (n.): A smith who makes jacks. See 2d Jack, 4, c.

Tret (n.): An allowance to purchasers, for waste or refuse matter, of four pounds on every 104 pounds of suttle weight, or weight after the tare deducted.

Pood (n.): A Russian weight, equal to forty Russian pounds or about thirty-six English pounds avoirdupois.

Batman (n.): A weight used in the East, varying according to the locality; in Turkey, the greater batman is about 157 pounds, the lesser only a fourth of this; at Aleppo and Smyrna, the batman is 17 pounds.

Rhyming (p. pr. & vb. n.): of Rhyme

Triplet (n.): Three verses rhyming together.

Cokenay (n.): A cockney.

Cockneys (pl. ): of Cockney

Horse power (): A unit of power, used in stating the power required to drive machinery, and in estimating the capabilities of animals or steam engines and other prime movers for doing work. It is the power required for the performance of work at the rate of 33,000 English units of work per minute; hence, it is the power that must be exerted in lifting 33,000 pounds at the rate of one foot per minute, or 550 pounds at the rate of one foot per second, or 55 pounds at the rate of ten feet per second, etc.

Clove (n.): A weight. A clove of cheese is about eight pounds, of wool, about seven pounds.

Cockney (a.): Of or relating to, or like, cockneys.

Quatrain (n.): A stanza of four lines rhyming alternately.

Rhymery (n.): The art or habit of making rhymes; rhyming; -- in contempt.

Like to add another meaning or definition of Jacks alive is London Cockney rhyming slang for five pounds sterling (five).?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to Jacks alive is London Cockney rhyming slang for five pounds sterling (five).

Meaning of JACKS ALIVE

JACKS ALIVE means: Jacks alive is London Cockney rhyming slang for five pounds sterling (five).

Meaning of jacks

jacks means: five pounds, from cockney rhyming slang: jack's alive

Meaning of HOUSE OF WAX

HOUSE OF WAX means: House of wax is London Cockney rhyming slang for five pounds sterling (Jacks). House of wax is irish slang for a lavatory.

Meaning of BIG BEN

BIG BEN means: Big Ben is London Cockney rhyming slang for ten pounds sterling. Big Ben was old London Cockney rhyming slang for ten shillings.

Meaning of TINY TIM

TINY TIM means: Tiny Tim is London Cockney rhyming slang for five pounds sterling (flim).

Meaning of CHARLIE CLORE

CHARLIE CLORE means: Charlie Clore is London Cockney rhyming slang for the floor.Charlie Clore is London Cockney rhyming slang for twenty pounds sterling (a score).

Meaning of BOTTLE OF SPRUCE

BOTTLE OF SPRUCE means: Bottle of spruce is London Cockney rhyming slang for two pounds sterling (deuce). Bottle of spruce is London Cockney rhyming slang for a deuce.Bottle of spruce is London Cockney rhyming slang for betting odds of /. Bottle of spruce was old London Cockney rhyming slang for a tuppence.

Meaning of SKY DIVER

SKY DIVER means: Sky diver is London Cockney rhyming slang for five pounds sterling (fiver). Sky diver is British slang for a pickpocket.

Meaning of BUCKET OF SAND

BUCKET OF SAND means: Bucket of sand is London Cockney rhyming slang for one thousand pounds sterling (grand).

Meaning of COCK AND HEN

COCK AND HEN means: Cock and hen is London Cockney rhyming slang for pen.Cock and hen is London Cockney rhyming slang for ten (especially ten pounds sterling).

Meaning of PAUL MCKENNA

PAUL MCKENNA means: Paul McKenna is London Cockney rhyming slang for ten pounds sterling (tenner).

Meaning of ALIVE OR DEAD

ALIVE OR DEAD means: Alive or dead was th century London Cockney rhyming slang for the head.

Meaning of garden/garden gate

garden/garden gate means: eight pounds (£8), cockney rhyming slang for eight, naturally extended to eight pounds. In spoken use 'a garden' is eight pounds. Incidentally garden gate is also rhyming slang for magistrate, and the plural garden gates is rhyming slang for rates. The word garden features strongly in London, in famous place names such as Hatton Garden, the diamond quarter in the central City of London, and Covent Garden, the site of the old vegetable market in West London, and also the term appears in sexual euphemisms, such as 'sitting in the garden with the gate unlocked', which refers to a careless pregnancy.

Meaning of TEAPOT LID

TEAPOT LID means: Tewapot lid is London Cockney rhyming slang for a child (kid).Teapot lid is London Cockney rhyming slang for one pound sterling (quid).Teapot lid is London Cockney rhyming slang for a Jew (Yid).

Meaning of commodore

commodore means: fifteen pounds (£15). The origin is almost certainly London, and the clever and amusing derivation reflects the wit of Londoners: Cockney rhyming slang for five pounds is a 'lady', (from Lady Godiva

Meaning of POUNDS AND PENCE

POUNDS AND PENCE means: Pounds and pence is London Cockney rhyming slang for sense.

Meaning of IN AND OUT

IN AND OUT means: In and out is British slang for sexual intercourse.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for snout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for spout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for sprout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for stout.In and out is London Cockney rhyming slang for tout.

Meaning of LINCOLN'S INN

LINCOLN'S INN means: Lincoln's Inn is London Cockney rhyming slang for hand (fin). Lincoln's Inn is London Cockney rhyming slang for five pounds (finn). Lincoln's Inn was th century London Cockney rhyming slang for gin.

Meaning of bag (of sand)

bag (of sand) means: Noun. £1000, a thousand pounds sterling. Rhyming slang on a 'grand'. Often shortened to bag.

Meaning of BUBBLE AND SQUEAK

BUBBLE AND SQUEAK means: Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for beak (a magistrate). Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for a Greek.Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for speak. Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for weak. Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for a week.Bubble and squeak is London Cockney rhyming slang for to urinate (leak).

Meaning of Sterling

Sterling means: Belonging to, or relating to, the standard British money of account, or the British coinage; as, a pound sterling; a shilling sterling; a penny sterling; -- now chiefly applied to the lawful money of England; but sterling cost, sterling value, are used.

Meaning of Cockney

Cockney means: A native or resident of the city of London; -- used contemptuously.

Meaning of Pony

Pony means: Twenty-five pounds sterling.

Meaning of Slangy

Slangy means: Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.

Meaning of Cantarro

Cantarro means: A weight used in southern Europe and East for heavy articles. It varies in different localities; thus, at Rome it is nearly 75 pounds, in Sardinia nearly 94 pounds, in Cairo it is 95 pounds, in Syria about 503 pounds.

Meaning of Alive

Alive means: In a state of action; in force or operation; unextinguished; unexpired; existent; as, to keep the fire alive; to keep the affections alive.

Meaning of Sterling

Sterling means: Genuine; pure; of excellent quality; conforming to the highest standard; of full value; as, a work of sterling merit; a man of sterling good sense.

Meaning of Tester

Tester means: An old French silver coin, originally of the value of about eighteen pence, subsequently reduced to ninepence, and later to sixpence, sterling. Hence, in modern English slang, a sixpence; -- often contracted to tizzy. Called also teston.

Meaning of Portague

Portague means: A Portuguese gold coin formerly current, and variously estimated to be worth from three and one half to four and one half pounds sterling.

Meaning of Hundredweight

Hundredweight means: A denomination of weight, containing 100, 112, or 120 pounds avoirdupois, according to differing laws or customs. By the legal standard of England it is 112 pounds. In most of the United States, both in practice and by law, it is 100 pounds avoirdupois, the corresponding ton of 2,000 pounds, sometimes called the short ton, being the legal ton.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.

Meaning of Slang-whanger

Slang-whanger means: One who uses abusive slang; a ranting partisan.

Meaning of Alive

Alive means: Having life, in opposition to dead; living; being in a state in which the organs perform their functions; as, an animal or a plant which is alive.

Meaning of Slang

Slang means: Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Meaning of Quarter

Quarter means: The fourth of a hundred-weight, being 25 or 28 pounds, according as the hundredweight is reckoned at 100 or 112 pounds.

Dictionary words and meanings

Meaning of Christian

Christian means: Pertaining to the church; ecclesiastical; as, a Christian court.

Meaning of Hilted

Hilted means: Having a hilt; -- used in composition; as, basket-hilted, cross-hilted.

Meaning of Keyed

Keyed means: Furnished with keys; as, a keyed instrument; also, set to a key, as a tune.

Meaning of Right

Right means: That which justly belongs to one; that which one has a claim to possess or own; the interest or share which anyone has in a piece of property; title; claim; interest; ownership.

Meaning of Rubian

Rubian means: One of several color-producing glycosides found in madder root.

Slang words and meanings

Meaning of PEACOCK

PEACOCK means: Peacock was old Australian slang for to acquire the best pieces of land in such a way that the surrounding land is useless to others.

Meaning of POLLY WOLLY DOODLES

POLLY WOLLY DOODLES means: Polly wolly doodles is London Cockney rhyming slang for noodles.

Meaning of Fess

Fess means: Young boy or young man

Meaning of Yannigan Bag

Yannigan Bag means: A bag in which the cowboy carried personal items, also known as a "war bag."

Meaning of DUST

DUST means: marijuana mixed with various chemicals

Tags: Slang Meaning of Jacks alive is London Cockney rhyming slang for five pounds sterling (five).. The slang definition of Jacks alive is London Cockney rhyming slang for five pounds sterling (five).. Did you find the slang meaning/definition of Jacks alive is London Cockney rhyming slang for five pounds sterling (five).? Please, add a definition of Jacks alive is London Cockney rhyming slang for five pounds sterling (five). if you did not find one from a search of Jacks alive is London Cockney rhyming slang for five pounds sterling (five)..

Copyrights © 2016 LingoMash. All Rights Reserved.